STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND: UNIT MISSION AND HISTORY SUMMARIES

by

MAJOR RITA F. CLARK
CMSgt HERMAN F. MARTIN

1 JULY 1988
OFFICE OF THE HISTORIAN
HEADQUARTERS STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND
OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, NEBRASKA

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PREFACE

Strategic Air Command is now in its forty-second year. Throughout this period, units assigned to SAC successfully performed their missions -both primary and collateral- on a daily basis. SAC units have played a critical role as the nation's strategic deterrent by placing and maintaining nuclear weapon systems on alert. Through the operation of the Airborne Command Post and the National Emergency Airborne Command Post positive command, control, and communication has been achieved. Reconnaissance units have supplied national leaders and war planners with a constant flow of vital information on the world military situation. Air refueling units have performed their missions daily by refueling the operational and training flights of all services and many allied countries. Furthermore, SAC units have trained and executed their responsibilities in support of conventional operations and monitoring sealanes.

The success experienced by SAC throughout its history is a tribute to the leadership, quality people, and professional performance that have become the trademarks of Strategic Air Command. This success is not surprising given the lineage and traditions of the units assigned to this command. SAC's units have garnered a rich heritage of exceptional achievement and proven performance in the service of their nation. The command is privileged to have the services of such outstanding units and the people who carry on the fine traditions of those units.

This work is designed to acquaint the reader with the missions and histories of the units assigned to Strategic Air Command. Major Rita F. Clark and CMSgt Herman F. Martin worked diligently to research and prepare the manuscript. SAC's unit historians and several reserve officers ably assisted them in their work.

JOHN T. BOHN
Command Historian
Office of the Historian

TABLE OF CONTENTS

AIR FORCES

Eighth Air Force
Fifteenth Air Force

AIR DIVISIONS

1st Strategic Aerospace Division
3d Air Division
4th Air Division
7th Air Division
12th Air Division
14th Air Division
19th Air Division
40th Air Division
42d Air Division
45th Air Division
57th Air Division

SAC UNITS

2d Bombardment Wing
5th Bombardment Wing
6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing
7th Bombardment Wing
9 th Strategic Wing
11th Strategic Group
17th Reconnaissance Wing
19th Air Refueling Wing
22d Air Refueling Wing
28th Bombardment Wing
42d Bombardment Wing
43d Bombardment Wing
44th Strategic Missile Wing
55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing
68th Air Refueling Wing
90th Strategic Missile Wing
91st Strategic Missile Wing
92d Bombardment Wing
93d Bombardment Wing
96th Bombardment Wing
97th Bombardment Wing
301st Air Refueling Wing
305th Air Refueling Wing
306th Strategic Wing
319th Bombardment Wing
320th Bombardment Wing
321st Strategic Missile Wing
340th Air Refueling Wing
341st Strategic Missile Wing
351st Strategic Missile Wing
376th Strategic Wing
379th Bombardment Wing
380th Bombardment Wing
384th Bombardment Wing
410th Bombardment Wing
416th Bombardment Wing
509th Bombardment Wing
544th Strategic Intelligence Wing

DIRECT REPORTING UNITS

1st Combat Evaluation Group
3901st Strategic Missile Evaluation Squadron
4315th Combat Crew Training Squadron

NUMBERED AIR FORCES

EIGHTH AIR FORCE
Barksdale Air Force Base, Bossier City, Louisiana
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

The mission of the Eighth Air Force (8th AF) is to command and administer aircraft, missiles and forces assigned by the Commander in Chief, Strategic Air Command (CINCSAC) to 8th AF; achieve and maintain at all times the level of alert force readiness directed by CINCSAC; organize, train, equip, and deploy through a Strategic Air Command (SAC) Advance Echelon those elements necessary to conduct conventional long range bombing operations IAW operations plans and to exercise operational control of SAC assets in the 8th AF areas of responsibility; and provide aerial tanker support for deploying forces as directed by CINCSAC.

HISTORY

Eighth Air Force was constituted as the VIII Bomber Command on 19 January 1942, and activated in the United States on 1 February 1942. On 23 February 1942, an advanced detachment of this unit arrived in England, with other units joining the detachment the following spring. Aircraft flown by the VIII Bomber Command during World War II included the B-17, B-24, B-25, and B-26. The VIII Bomber Command was redesignated the Eighth Air Force on 22 February 1944. At the same time, a previously existing organization designated as Headquarters, Eighth Air Force was redesignated U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe. The present 8th AF traces its lineage to the VIII Bomber Command, rather than to U.S. Strategic Forces in Europe. From bases in England, the Eighth's heavy bombers carried out strategic bombardment of Nazi Germany and proved that daylight precision bombing of strategic targets was possible. The 8th AF flew over 600,000 sorties, mostly by heavy bombers that delivered over 700,000 tons of bombs on the German war-making machine. The 8th also reportedly destroyed over 15,000 enemy aircraft— more than any other American Air Force in Europe or North America. The 8th AF transferred without personnel, equipment and combat elements to Okinawa on 16 July 1945, however, the war ended before 8th AF personnel went into combat against Japan. Effective 7 June 1946, Headquarters Eighth Air Force was transferred, without personnel and equipment, from the United States Army Forces, Pacific, to MacDill Field, Florida, and assigned to SAC. On 1 November 1946, the headquarters moved to Fort Worth Army Airfield (later designated Carswell AFB), Fort Worth, Texas. Expansion and modern weapon system acquisition characterized the 8th AF in the late Forties and Fifties. Headquarters Eighth Air Force moved to Westover AFB, Massachusetts on 13 June 1955. The first 8th AF intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) unit became operational during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. In 1963, 8th AF acquired Titan I, Titan II, and Atlas units from 15th AF and 2d AF and a small Minuteman missile force. All Atlas and Titan I missiles were disposed of in 1965 and the B-47 and KC-97 were phased out by early 1966. On 1 April 1970, Headquarters Eighth Air Force moved, without personnel or equipment, to Andersen AFB, Guam, and absorbed personnel and functions of the inactivated 3d AD. Its operations consisted mainly of Arc Light conventional bombing and KC-135 tanker missions in Southeast Asia, although 8th AF personnel were also vital to Commando Hunt V and Linebacker II missions and bombing operations in Laos and Cambodia. On 1 January 1975, Headquarters Eighth Air Force transferred, without personnel and equipment, to Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, replacing the inactivated Headquarters Second Air Force. The 8th AF received its first B-1B bomber and deactivated the last Titan II missile wing in 1987. There are currently four air divisions and eighteen wings assigned to the 8th.

FIFTEENTH AIR FORCE
March Air Force Base, Riverside, California
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

The mission of the Fifteenth Air Force (15th AF) is to command and administer aircraft, missiles and support forces assigned by the Commander in Chief, Strategic Air Command (CINCSAC) to 15th AF; achieve and maintain at all times the level of alert force readiness directed by CINCSAC; organize, train, equip, and be prepared to deploy and employ through a Strategic Air Command (SAC) Advance Echelon those elements necessary to conduct conventional long range bombing operations in accordance with the U.S. Commander in Chief, Pacific (CINCPAC) operations plans; organize, train, and equip reconnaissance forces and be prepared to conduct SAC long range reconnaissance operations; and provide aerial tanker support for deploying forces as directed by CINCSAC.

HISTORY

The Fifteenth Air Force was constituted on 30 October 1943, and activated on 1 November 1943, at Tunis, Tunisia. Air crews from the 15th flew their first combat mission from North African bases on that same day. Headquarters Fifteenth moved to Bari, Italy, on 1 December 1943. During eighteen months of operations in World War II, 15th AF air crews destroyed almost half of all the fuel production capacity in Europe, a large part of the German fighter production capability, and crippled the enemy's transportation system over half of once-occupied Europe. Fifteenth bombers also provided tactical support for ground forces on the Italian peninsula and for the Allied invasion of Axis-occupied Southern France. Fifteenth Air Force was inactivated on 15 September 1945, but was reactivated on 31 March 1946, at Colorado Springs, Colorado, as the first numbered air force under SAC. For the next four years, 15th AF personnel created and trained a strategic bombing force of B-29 and B-50 Superfortresses. Headquarters, Fifteenth Air Force moved to March AFB, California, on 7 November 1949. Fifteenth B-29 aircraft and crews flew conventional bombing strikes in Korea from 1950 until the war ended in 1953. The Korean War began a period of rapid expansion and development for the 15th AF. The B-36 and jet powered B-47 replaced the Superfortresses, but were themselves replaced by the B-52. During the Fifties, the 15th developed an extensive air refueling capability using KB-29, KC-97, and KC-135 tankers. The first 15th AF intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) squadron became operational in 1960. The rapid development of ICBM technology resulted in the Atlas and Titan I missiles being replaced by Minuteman I and Titan II ICBMs by 1965. By 1970, 15th AF had an ICBM arsenal of Minuteman I, Minuteman II, Minuteman III, and Titan II missiles. During the 1960s, 15th AF assumed responsibility for all SAC airborne reconnaissance employing the RC-135, U-2, and SR-71 aircraft. The SAC airborne command post became a 15th AF responsibility on 3 February 1961. From 1965 to 1973, 15th AF bombardment and refueling wings had a dual mission: support the war effort in Southeast Asia with personnel and equipment and maintain a nuclear deterrent capability at home. In late 1979, 15th AF acquired early warning and space surveillance responsibilities for four years. New aircraft assigned to 15th AF in the Eighties include the E-4B National Emergency Airborne Command Post, the TR-1 strategic reconnaissance aircraft in 1981, the KC-10 Extender in 1982, and the B1-B bomber in 1985. The only Titan II ICBM wing assigned to 15th AF was inactivated in 1984, while the first Peacekeeper missile squadron achieved initial operational capability in 1986. There are currently five air divisions and eighteen wings assigned to the 15th.

AIR DIVISIONS

1st STRATEGIC AEROSPACE DIVISION
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Lompoc, California
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

To conduct Strategic Air Command (SAC) missile combat crew training; operational testing of Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) related programs; evaluate SAC ICBM performance to develop Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) planning factors for the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS); and to provide base and weapon system Research and Development (R&D) test support to tenant units.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 1st Strategic Aerospace Division (1 STRAD) was organized on 30 August 1943 and activated on 13 September 1943 as the 1st Bombardment Division at Brampton Grange, England. Within 48 hours of its activation, the division's B-17 bombers were bombing enemy installations in France. Division bombers were also the leading elements in attacks on the ballbearing factories at Schweinfurt, Germany. On 1 January 1945, the unit was redesignated the 1st Air Division, but was inactivated on 31 October 1945. During its 20 months of combat, the division earned the Presidential Unit Citation, six battle honor awards, and eight unit members were awarded the Medal of Honor. After the war, the 1st Air Division was revived twice as a B-29 command: first in Okinawa as a mobile combat strike force from 7 June 1946 until 1 December 1948; and later as a meteorological survey command assigned to SAC from 1 July 1954 until 20 May 1956. On 15 April 1957, the division was redesignated the 1st Missile Division under the Air Research and Development Command (ARDC) and activated on 15 April 1957 at Inglewood, California. The division moved to Cooke Air Force Base (later renamed Vandenberg AFB) on 16 July 1957. Six months later, both the base and division were transferred from ARDC to SAC in preparation for adding ballistic missiles to SAC's operational inventory. The first missile launch from Vendenberg AFB occurred on 16 December 1958, when a crew from the division's 392d Missile Training Squadron fired a Thor intermediate range ballistic missile 1500 miles into the Pacific Ocean. In September 1959, the division's 576th Strategic Missile Squadron launched Vandenberg's first ICBM, an Atlas D. The nation's first ICBM, an Atlas D, achieved alert status on 31 October 1959 at the division's Vandenberg launch emplacement 576A-1. Initially designated as the overall command for the ballistic force, the division lost its operational missile units to the numbered air forces by 1960, restricting its main mission to Vandenberg activities. On 21 July 1961, the division was redesignated the 1st Strategic Aerospace Division, a title more appropraite to its current mission: conducting and controlling test launches, training missile combat crews for the alert force, and supporting the diversified launch programs conducted by a variety of agencies. The division expanded its missile alert contribution during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 by activating all of the Vandenberg missile launch facilities with armed ICBM weapons to supplement the normal SAC alert deterrent force. Although these early alert activities ceased in 1965, the division's Titan II ICBM facilities were later incorporated into the alert force in 1967, but ceased operations two years later. No missiles are on alert at Vandenberg AFB today, but the 1 STRAD continues as an essential element of SAC's alert posture by training the combat crews who maintain the deterrent alert 24 hours a day were trained by the division's 4315th Combat Crew Training Squadron (CCTS). The division was reassigned from Headquarters SAC to 15th AF on 1 September 1988. Currently, the 1 STRAD has four subordinate units directly assigned: 4392d Aerospace Support Wing, the 394th ICBM Test Maintenance Squadron, 4315th CCTS (missile), and the 1st Strategic Hospital. As host command at Vandenberg AFB, the 1st Strategic Aerospace Division provides base support for approximately 40 government and over 65 commercial agencies located on base to include some of the best known aerospace contractors.

3d AIR DIVISION
Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 3d Air Division (3d AD) is to assure that assigned units are capable of conducting the following: long range bombardment; air refueling; contingency and mobility operations, to include aerial minelaying, sea reconnaissance/surveillance, and anti-surface warfare; and host/tenant support activities.

BRIEF HISTORY

The history of the 3d Air Division began on 13 September 1943 when the 3d Bombardment Division was activated at Camp Blainey, England. The division's first commander was Colonel Curtis E. LeMay (later to become the second Commander in Chief of Strategic Air Command). Colonel LeMay immediately began to build the division into a potent combat force. On 1 January 1945, the division was redesignated the 3d Air Division because its mix of bombers and fighters made it more than a bombardment division. The division was inactivated on 21 November 1945. On 23 August 1948, the 3d AD was organized at Marham, England, and assigned to the U.S. Air Forces in Europe. The division's primary job was to administer and control attached bombardment organizations deployed from the U.S. for training purposes. On 21 September 1948, the division moved to Bushy Park, England. The 3d AD was discontinued and replaced by the recently established Third Air Force on 1 May 1951. In late 1953, the division was once again redesignated 3d AD (Operational) and on 25 October 1953 was activated in Wiesbaden, Germany. Its planned mission of airlift operations in Europe was taken over by the 322d Air Division (Combat Cargo) and on 1 March 1954, the 3d was once again inactivated. The 3d was activated at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, on 18 June 1954, and assigned to SAC. The 3d assumed operational control over SAC bombardment, reconnaissance and air refueling resources deployed from the U.S. For 15 years, Andersen AFB remained the primary base for deployed forces from the U.S. On 1 April 1970, the 3d AD was inactivated and replaced by Eighth Air Force. On 1 January 1975, the 3d Air Division was brought out of retirement to assume Eighth Air Force's responsibilities in the Pacific. Currently, the 3d Air Division's major subordinate units are the 43d Bombardment Wing, Andersen AFB, Guam, and the 376th Strategic Wing, Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. The division also has three operating locations (OL). These are: OL-DG (Diego Garcia); OL-HI (Hickam AFB, Hawaii); and OL-OS (Osan AB, Republic of Korea). The 3rd AD is scheduled to move to Hickam AFB, Hawaii in 1988.

4th AIR DIVISION
Francis E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

To assure that assigned units are capable of conducting strategic aerospace warfare by maintaining a constant state of alert and by deploying, when called upon, intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), and long range bombardment and air refueling aircraft according to the Emergency War Order (EWO).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 4th Air Division originated as the 4th Bombardment Wing, Medium, and activated at Mitchell Field, New York, on 18 December 1940. The wing moved to Westover Field, Massachusetts, for its initial training on 20 March 1941. The 4th moved to England in May 1942 to begin its actual combat missions. During the war, the 4th Bomb Wing was commanded by a number of now-illustrious commanders, including Brigadier General James H. Doolittle, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay, and Brigadier General Frederick W. Castle. The 4th Bomb Wing participated in many allied bombing offensives and received a Distinguished Unit Citation on 17 August 1943. On 18 June 1945, after three years of combat, the 4th was disbanded in England. The immediate post-war duty of the 4th Bomb Wing involved reserve pilot training from Mitchell Field, New York, until the wing was inactivated on 27 June 1949. Two years later, the 4th was redesignated the 4th Air Division (4th AD) and activated at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, on 10 February 1951. For the next twelve years, the new 4th AD would oversee and command a variety of units and aircraft. In September 1964, the division moved to Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota, and was redesignated the 4th Strategic Aerospace Division (4th SAD). Its newly assigned units included the 321st Strategic Missile Wing. In April 1970, the division moved to March AFB, California. The 4th SAD was inactivated in June 1971, redesignated the 4th Strategic Missile Division, and moved to Francis E. Warren AFB, Wyoming, on 1 July 1971. Two years later, the 4th was redesignated the 4th Air Division. The 4th Air Division consists of one B-1B bomb wing, two KC-135R refueling wings and three ICBM wings (Minuteman II and III and Peacekeeper). These units and weapon systems are at the forefront of the president's program to modernize the nation's strategic defenses and the SAC alert forces program. The 4th AD is scheduled to be inactivated on 23 August 1988.

7th AIR DIVISION
Ramstein Air Base, Germany
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To coordinate and monitor all bomber, tanker, and reconnaissance activity in the European theater; represent the Strategic Air Command's (SAC's) interests to the numerous agencies of United States Air Forces in Europer (USAFE), United States European Command (USEUCOM), Allied Command Europe (ACE), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and foreign governments, as necessary, to ensure SAC forces can accomplish their assigned missions; assure assigned units are capable of conducting aerial refueling, strategic and tactical reconnaissance, and contingency operations as tasked by higher headquarters; maintain capability to rapidly deploy its headquarters personnel during a crisis to form the nucleus of SAC's European advanced echelon (SAC ADVON) team, providing expertise and advice to supported NATO commanders on the effective and efficient employment of SAC assets.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 7th Air Division was initially constituted and activated as the 7th Fighter Wing at Fort Shafter, Hawaii, on 21 April 1944.

[This 7th Fighter Wing should not be confused with an earlier 7th Fighter Wing which participated in combat in North Africa, was later redesignated as the 47th Bombardment Wing, and presently exists as the 47th Air Division.]

The wing's original mission was air defense of the Hawaiian Islands. Following the war, the wing rapidly demobilized until only two radar stations remained open in early 1946. By mid-year, rebuilding efforts began and training exercises resumed on a regular basis. The 7th Fighter Wing became the 7th Air Division when the Seventh Air Force was redesignated the Pacific Air Command (PAC) on 15 December 1947. On 1 May 1948, the division inactivated and its resources passed to the 81st Fighter Wing. The same day, the 7th was organized at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, with new personnel and a new mission as the major component of PAC. The 7th was discontinued on 1 September 1948, when the PAC's expansion plans failed to materialize. The 7th Air Division was activated on 20 March 1951, stationed at Victoria Park Estate, South Ruislip, England, and assigned to SAC. It exercised control over SAC forces deployed to the United Kingdom in response to the Berlin Blockade, and the Korean War. On 16 June 1952, the division inactivated and reorganized the same day. The new organization permitted more flexibility for expansion and contraction as needs dictated. The 7th was discontinued on 30 June 1965, but was activated at Ramstein AB, Germany, and assigned to SAC on 1 July 1978. The division activated with only one subordinate unit assigned, the 306th Strategic Wing stationed at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom. A second unit was added on 13 November 1978, when the 11th Strategic Group was activated at RAF Fairford, United Kingdom. The 19th Surveillance Squadron located on Pirinclik Installation in Turkey became the third 7th AD unit on 1 December 1979. On 31 January 1982, the 7th began reporting to 8th AF instead of SAC. The fourth and last unit assigned to the division was the 17th Reconnaissance Wing, activated at RAF Alconbury, United Kingdom, on 1 October 1982. Seven months later, the division lost the 19th when it transferred to Space Command, leaving the 306th, 11th, and 17th to form the current organization of the 7th. Today, division activities focus on the role of SAC assets in support of United States and NATO interests in the European theater. The 7th manages the European tanker force, consisting of KC-135A/E/R and KC-10 aircraft temporarily assigned to the 11th and 306th. This force provides refueling support to a variety of United States and NATO aircraft. The division closely monitors all reconnaissance activity in the theater, especially the permanently assigned TR-1 aircraft of the 17th and the RC-135U/V/W aircraft temporarily assigned to the 306th. Additionally, the division is very involved in scheduling and coordinating B-52 operations in the theater, even though none of its units have the bomber assigned either permanently or temporarily. Activity in this area increased significantly in 1987 due to the expansion of the conventional role of the B-52 in Europe. Finally, the 7th is instrumental in updating and coordinating the numerous operations plans that cover the wartime employment of SAC resources in support of NATO.

12th AIR DIVISION
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

Assure unit Emergency War Order (EWO) capability and combat crew training conducted at Castle and Dyess Air Force bases, continually evaluate qualification training, direct correction or improvement when appropriate, and represent training concerns to higher headquarters.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 12th Air Division (12th AD) was constituted as the 12th Pursuit Wing on 19 October 1940 and activated in the Panama Canal Zone on 20 November 1940. It was inactivated on 6 March 1942, but was redesignated as the 12th Bombardment Wing and activated on 8 September 1942. No groups were assigned. The 12th moved to England in late 1942 and was assigned to 8th AF. All personnel and equipment were withdrawn in January 1943. The wing was disbanded in England on 9 October 1944. The 12th Bombardment Wing was reconstituted and redesignated as the 12th Bombardment Wing, Light, and assigned to the Reserves on 3 July 1947. The wing was activated on 3 August 1947 and redesignated as the 12th Air Division (Bombardment) in April 1948, but was inactivated on 27 June 1949. On 10 February 1951, the 12th was redesignated the 12th Air Division, assigned to SAC, and moved to March AFB, California. The 12th AD moved to Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, and was redesignated the 12th Strategic Air Division in 1962. The division was redesignated as the 12th Strategic Missile Division in 1971 and as the 12th Air Division in 1973. The 12th AD moved to Dyess AFB, Texas, on 30 September 1976. On 1 October 1985, the division was realigned to make all aircrew training for the B-1B, B-52, and KC-135 aircraft the responsibility of the 12th Air Division. The 12th AD moved to Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, on 15 July 1988. Three wings are currently assigned to the 12th AD: 96 BMW at Dyess AFB, Texas, 93 BMW at Castle AFB, California, and 320 BMW at Mather AFB, California.

14th AIR DIVISION
Beale Air Force Base, California
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

Assure that units assigned to the 14th Air Division (14th AD) are able to conduct worldwide strategic reconnaissance, worldwide air refueling, post-attack command and control systems (maintain an airborne command post in continuous operation) and maintain the E-4 National Emergency Airborne Command Post in support of the National Command requirements. The 14th AD is also responsible for all initial AF combat crew training in SR-71, U-2, and TR-1 aircraft, as well as air refueling for E-4 and EC- and RC-135 aircrews. Additionally, the 14th AD is the focal point for reconnaissance concerns within 15th AF, representing reconnaissance issues to higher headquarters and assessing total reconnaissance requirements.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 14th Air Division was constituted as the 14th Pursuit Wing on 19 October 1940 and activated in Hawaii on 1 November 1940. Wing personnel suffered heavy losses during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, but managed to shoot down several enemy aircraft. The wing was inactivated in Hawaii on 23 January 1942, but was redesignated the 14th Bombardment Wing and activated on 1 October 1942. It was redesignated the 14th Bombardment Wing (Heavy) in February 1943 and moved to England in June 1943. It was redesignated the 14th Combat Bombardment Wing (Heavy) in August 1943. The 14th received groups in September 1943 and served in combat in the European theater until April 1945. The wing was redesignated the 14th Bombardment Wing (Heavy) in June 1945, returned to the United States in August, and was inactivated on 7 November 1945. It was redesignated the 14th Air Division and assigned to the Strategic Air Command at Travis AFB, California, on 10 February 1951. The 14th moved to Beale AFB, California, on 1 October 1959. Three wings are currently assigned to the 14 AD: the 6th SRW at Eielson AFB, Alaska, the 9th SRW at Beale AFB, California, and the 55th SRW at Offutt AFB, Nebraska.

19th AIR DIVISION
Carswell Air Force Base, Texas
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To assure that assigned units are capable of conducting long-range bombardment, sustained and effective air refueling and missile warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 19th Air Division (19th AD) was originally constituted on 8 May 1929 as the 19th Composite Wing. It was activated on 1 April 1931, moved to the Panama Canal Zone in January 1933, and redesignated the 19th Wing in 1937 and the 19th Bombardment Wing in 1940. The 19th was inactivated in the Canal Zone on 25 October 1941 and activated at MacDill Field, Florida on 24 July 1942. The 19th moved to Europe for World War II and was redesignated the IX Bomber Command in November 1942. Following two more redesignations as the 9th Bombardment Division, Medium, in August 1944 and the 9th Air Division in May 1945, it was inactivated in Europe on 20 November 1945. The division was redesignated the 19th Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, allotted to the Reserve and activated in Birmingham, Alabama, on 20 December 1946. The 19th was redesignated the 19th Air Division, Bombardment, in April 1948 and inactivated on 27 June 1949. The division was redesignated the 19th Air Division, organized, assigned to Strategic Air Command (SAC), and activated at Carswell AFB, Texas, on 16 February 1951. The 19th was not a tactical organization like preceeding air divisions, but directed and correlated the operations of bomb wings, air base groups, and medical units. Currently, the 19th Air Division has no units assigned to it since it is scheduled to be inactivated on 30 September 1988.

40th AIR DIVISION
Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To assure assigned units are manned, trained, and equipped to conduct strategic air warfare on a global scale, using nuclear and conventional weapons; to develop and maintain air refueling capability; to train and equip the 40th Air Division staff for contingency and Single Integrated Operations Plan (SI0P) operations in support of applicable plans; and to develop and maintain other special mission capability as directed by the Commander in Chief, SAC; or Commander, Eighth Air Force.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 40th Air Division (40th AD) was constituted as the 40th Bombardment Wing on 15 January 1943 and activated six days later at MacDill Field, Florida. The wing was redesignated the 40th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 3 May 1943, and moved to Europe in preparation for World War II combat. Initially, no combat groups were assigned to the wing. After redesignation as the 40th Combat Bombardment Wing on 30 August 1943, the wing was assigned three bombardment groups and began flying combat missions. During the next two and one-half years, 40th aircraft flew over 25,723 sorties and dropped 62,151 tons of bombs. In June 1945, the wing was redesignated the 40th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, and inactivated at Erlangen, Germany, on 25 December 1946. The wing was redesignated Headquarters, 40th Air Division, assigned to SAC, and organized at Turner Air Force Base, Georgia, on 14 March 1951. In 1957, the Air Force transferred Turner Air Force Base to the Tactical Air Command (TAC) and inactivated the 40th AD on 1 April 1957. The 40th AD was activated at Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan, on 8 July 1959. The 40th Air Division was inactivated on 8 June 1988.

42d AIR DIVISION
Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To assure assigned units are manned, trained, and equipped to conduct strategic air warfare on a global scale, using nuclear and conventional weapons; monitor the assignment of Emergency War Order (EWO) tasks and ensure that assigned units are prepared to perform current emergency plans and related operations orders; develop and maintain air refueling capability; and perform other special missions as may be directed by the Commander, Eighth Air Force and/or Commander in Chief, Strategic Air Command (SAC).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 42d Air Division was originally constituted as the 42d Bombardment Wing (Dive) and activated on 16 February 1943 at Birmingham Army Air Base, Alabama. It was redesignated the 42d Bombardment Wing (Medium) and moved to North Africa on 31 July 1943. During World War II, the 42d flew strategic and tactical missions against targets in Italy, France, and Germany. The division flew its last operational mission against gun emplacements on the French Atlantic coast on 1 May 1945. On 25 October 1945, the 42d was inactivated at the New York Port of Embarkation, Camp Shanks, New York. The 42d was subsequently redesignated Headquarters, 42d Air Division and organized and assigned to SAC at Bergstrom AFB, Texas, on 10 March 1951. The 42d was transferred to the Tactical Air Command from 1 July 1957 until it was inactivated on 8 January 1958. The 42d was activated at McConnell AFB, Kansas, on 15 July 1959, and assigned to SAC. The 42d was redesignated the 42d Strategic Aerospace Division on 1 June 1962. On 1 July 1963, the 42d moved to Blytheville AFB, Arkansas, and was redesignated the 42d Air Division. The division was inactivated on 2 July 1969, but was reactivated at Blytheville AFB on 1 January 1970. On 30 June 1971, the 42d moved to McCoy AFB, Florida, but moved back to Blytheville AFB (later renamed Eaker AFB) on 1 September 1973. The 42d was moved to Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota, on 16 June 1988, and was assigned the 319th BMW at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota and the 321st SMW, Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota.

45th AIR DIVISION
Pease Air Force Base, New Hampshire
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To assure that assigned units are capable of conducting long-range bombardment, sustained and effective air refueling, missile warfare and strategic reconnaissance according to the Emergency War Order (EWO) as applicable.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 45th Air Division (45th AD) was originally constituted as the 45th Bombardment Wing, Medium, and activated on 1 April 1943 at MacDill Field, Florida. It was redesignated the 45th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 25 August 1943. Two years later, the 45th had flown 322 strategic and tactical missions. Its final missions during World War II were mercy-type missions; air dropping food and other supplies to destitute people in Holland, transporting displaced European people in eastern Germany to their respective native countries and moving allied troops and prisoners of war from Germany. The 45th disbanded on 18 June 1945 at Snetterton Heath, Norfold, England. The wing was reconstituted and redesignated the 45th Air Division and assigned to SAC on 24 September 1954. It was activated at Loring AFB, Maine, and assigned to Eighth Air Force on 8 October 1954. The division's original mission was similar to its current mission: be prepared for immediate and sustained long-range offensive bombardment and air-to-air refueling operations in any part of the world. The 45th AD was inactivated on 18 January 1958, but was activated on 20 November 1958, at Loring AFB, Maine. The 817th Air Division at Pease AFB, New Hampshire, was phased out in 1971 and the 45th AD was transferred to Pease AFB on 1 July 1971. The transfer was in name only and did not involve any personnel changes. Currently, the 45th AD is assigned three bomb wings: the 42th BMW at Loring AFB, Maine, the 509th BMW at Pease AFB, New Hampshire, and the 380th BMW at Plattsburgh AFB, New York. These units fly B-52G and FB-111A bombers and KC-135A/Q tankers.

57th AIR DIVISION
Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 57th Air Division is to ensure its assigned units are manned, trained, and equipped to conduct long-range bombardment missions using either nuclear or conventional weapons; develop and maintain the capacity for effective air refueling operations; develop and maintain the capacity for effective strategic aerospace warfare using intercontinental ballistic missiles; ensure support of Reserve and National Guard programs by its subordinate units.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 57th Air Division (57th AD) was originally constituted as the 8th Pursuit Wing and activated at Maxwell Field, Alabama, on 6 November 1940. The 8th moved to West Palm Beach (later called Morrison Field), Florida, on 16 May 1941. The wing was inactivated on 1 November 1941. The 8th was redesignated the 8th Fighter Wing and activated at Drew Field, Florida, on 24 July 1942. On 6 April 1943, the 8th was redesignated the 57th Bombardment Wing and moved to Egypt and, later, Tunis, Tunisia. After seeing action in North Africa and the Mediterranean, the wing was inactivated on 12 September 1945. The unit was reactivated on 16 April 1951, as the 57th Air Division at Fairchild AFB, Washington. The 57th moved to Westover AFB, Massachusetts, on 4 September 1956, where it remained until it was inactivated on 2 July 1969. On 22 January 1975, the 57th AD was activated at Minot AFB, North Dakota. The 57th AD is currently assigned two combat wings, the 91st Strategic Missile Wing (Minuteman III) and the 5th Bombardment Wing (B-52 and KC-135A).

WINGS

2d BOMBARDMENT WING
Barksdale Air Force Base, Bossier City, Louisiana
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 2d Bombardment Wing (2d BMW) is to maintain a combat ready force of B-52 bomber aircraft with sufficient numbers of KC-135 air refueling aircraft to support those bombers with air-to-air refueling to ensure global target acquisition. In addition, the wing's B-52 and KC-135 aircraft are directly tasked to support Strategic Air Command's (SAC's) Single Integrated Operations Plan (SIOP) for national defense. The wing has an additional mission of providing a combat ready force of KC-10 tankers for use in a Rapid Deployment Force role as directed by SAC and higher headquarters.

BRIEF HISTORY

The history of the 2d BMW is nearly as old as military aviation itself. The wing was originally organized as the 1st Day Bombardment Group in France in September 1918. From September to November 1918, the unit took part in several bombing missions, including a raid by 353 Allied planes under the command of Colonel William (Billy) Mitchell. Shortly after the armistice in November 1918, the unit was demobilized and not reorganized until September 1919 at Kelly Field, Texas. In 1921, the unit was redesignated the 2d Bombardment Group. During the 1920s and 1930s, the unit engaged in routine training; tested and experimented with equipment and tactics; and took part in William (Billy) Mitchell's demonstrations of aerial bombardment on battleships. In 1937, the unit received the first B-17 delivered to the Army and made many pioneering flights in this type of aircraft during the next few years. In 1943, the unit moved to North Africa and remained in the European Theater until after V-E Day. The unit was inactivated in Italy in February 1946, after 27 years of active service. The unit was redesignated the 2d Bombardment Wing, Medium, and activated on 12 July 1948. In late 1949, the wing converted from B-29 to B-50 bombers and to B-47 bombers in 1954. In April 1963, the wing became the 2d Bombardment Wing, Heavy, and moved to Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, replacing the 4238th Strategic Wing and absorbing that wing's B-52 and KC-135 resources. From 1963 until 1970, the wing supported the Second Air Force's Post Attack Command Control System (PACCS). In April 1968, the wing gained a second B-52 and a second tanker squadron and became a SAC "super" wing. During the early 1970s, most of the wing's bomber and tanker forces were deployed to other organizations in support of SAC's operations in Southeast Asia. In April 1981, the wing began adding the KC-10 to its tanker force. The wing currently consists of two squadrons equipped with B-52G bombers and two tanker squadrons—one equipped with KC-135A aircraft and the other with KC-10 aircraft.

5th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Minot Air Force Base, Minot, North Dakota
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 5th Bombardment Wing (5th BMW) is to maintain its ability to conduct strategic offensive and defensive warfare in accordance with the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) and taskings specified in the Emergency War Order (EWO).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 5th Bombardment Wing was activated in August 1919 in Hawaii as the 2d Group (Observation). The unit underwent a series of redesignations from 1921 until 1922 when the unit became the 5th Composite Group. During this period, the group trained, participated in Army-Navy maneuvers, sowed seeds from the air for the Territorial Forestry Division, and bombed a stream of lava flowing from Mauna Loa to divert it from the city of Hilo. On 9 March 1938, the unit was redesignated as the 5th Bombardment Group and moved to Hickam Field, Hawaii, on 1 January 1939, where it primarily engaged in search and patrol missions off Hawaii. The group suffered devastating personnel casualties and serious equipment damage during the surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. From 8 December 1941 until the summer of 1942, the group carried out armed reconnaissance missions. The unit left Hawaii in 1942 and spent the rest of World War II moving across the South Pacific flying reconnaissance and combat missions against enemy positions. At the conclusion of the war, the unit became the 5th Reconnaissance Group and mapped areas of the Philippines, Formosa and the Pescadores. The group moved to Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, on 26 May 1949, but was redesignated as the 5th Strategic Reconaissance Group on 16 July 1949, and moved to Fairfield-Suisun (later Travis) AFB, California, on 9 November 1949. The 5th was redesignated the 5th Strategic Reconnaissance Group (Heavy) on 14 November 1950, and redesignated as the 5th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing (Heavy) on 4 January 1951. The wing performed long range strategic reconnaissance missions with RB-29 and RB-36 aircraft until 1 October 1955, when it was designated the 5th Bombardment Wing, Heavy. In 1959, the wing converted to B-52s and assumed the additional mission of aerial refueling with KC-135 tankers. On 25 July 1968, the wing moved without personnel or equipment to Minot AFB, North Dakota, and absorbed the resources of the 450th Bombardment Wing. During the Vietnam era, the wing continued its normal mission, as well as flying combat missions in Southeast Asia. The Short Range Attack Missile was added to the wing's inventory on 28 September 1973 and was first used on alert aircraft on 31 December 1973. In 1980, the 5th gained a new mission when it became part of the Strategic Projection Force, the Air Force component of the Rapid Deployment Force. The wing currently consists of one squadron equipped with B-52H aircraft and another squadron with KC-135A aircraft.

6th STRATEGIC RECONNAISSANCE WING
Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing (6th SRW) is to provide routine and no-notice strategic reconnaissance using RC-135 and KC-135 aircraft, respectively.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, the third oldest in the Air Force, was originally designated as the 3d Observation Group when it was organized at France Field, Panama Canal Zone, in September 1919. The group was reorganized and redesignated the 6th Observation Group in 1921 and as the 6th Composite Group in 1922. The group's mission was primarily concerned with the defense of the canal; including training, participating in maneuvers, flying patrol missions, photographing the canal area, and making goodwill flights. The 6th Group disbanded in the fall of 19^3 when it became apparent that an enemy attack on the Panama Canal was unlikely. The unit was reconstituted as the 6th Bombardment Group in 1944. Equipped with B-17s and later B-29s, the group moved to the Pacific in 1944 to support Allied war efforts in that area. After the war, the group dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and took part in show-of-force flights over Japan. The group was inactivated on Okinawa in October 1948. As a result of the hostilities in Korea, the 6th Bombardment Wing was activated at Walker AFB, New Mexico, in early 1951 and was assigned B-29 and KB-29 aircraft. In 1952, the wing took possession of the new B-36 bomber and completed conversion to the B-52 bomber and the KC-135 tanker by 1958. From the late 1950s through the mid-1960s, the wing performed a training mission, including the training of B-52 and KC-135 crews. To counter the growing Soviet missile threat, an Atlas missile squadron was assigned to the wing's resources from 1962 until 1965. In March 1967, the wing moved without personnel or equipment to Eielson AFB, Alaska, where it replaced the 4157th Strategic Wing and assumed the resources and missions of that wing. The wing also took over a detachment located on the western tip of the Aleutian Island chain at Shemya AFB. With this relocation to Alaska, the wing returned to the first mission it was assigned: reconnaissance. The wing is currently assigned RC-135 reconnaissance aircraft and is equipped with KC-135 tankers temporarily reassigned from other units.

7th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Carswell Air Force Base, Fort Worth, Texas
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 7th Bombardment Wing (7th BMW) is the deterrence of war, especially nuclear, by providing ready, flexible, and credible strategic offensive forces capable of responding decisively across a spectrum of threats to the nation's vital security interests. The wing must prepare its bombardment and air refueling crews and support units to perform global bombardment operations, while also being prepared to conduct missions assigned in the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 7th Bombardment Wing originated with the activation of the 1st Army Observation Group at Park Field, Tennessee, in October 1919. In 1919, Major Carl Spaatz, who became Commanding General of the Army Air Forces and the first Air Force Chief of Staff, assumed command of the group. The group was redesignated the 7th Group (Observation) in March 1921, but was inactivated in August of the same year. The group was redesignated the 7th Bombardment Group in 1928 at Rockwell Field, California. During the 1930s, the group's primary mission was cadet training. The group was on its way to the Philippines when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. The ground echelon was diverted to Australia and later sent to Java. Six of the group's B-17s reached Hawaii during the enemy attack, but were able to land safely. The remainder of the air echelon flew from the U.S. to Java. Throughout the war, the group operated from Java and various stations in India to support Allied operations in the Far East with B-17, LB-30 and B-24 aircraft. At the conclusion of the war, the group returned to the U.S. and was inactivated. In 19^6, the group was reactivated at Fort Worth Army Air Field (now Carswell AFB), Texas, and assigned to the newly organized Strategic Air Command (SAC). The group was redesignated the 7th Bombardment Wing in 1947. Initially equipped with B-29 aircraft, the wing converted to B-36 aircraft in 1948. The wing converted to B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers in 1958 and continued its mission of global strategic and air refueling training. In 1965, 7th aircraft bombed Viet Cong strongholds in South Vietnam. The wing deployed most of its resources to various organizations to support SAC operations in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam conflict. In late 1972, the wing participated in the first strategic bombing mission ever flown by B-52s: Linebacker II. As aircraft and crews returned from Southeast Asia, the wing returned to its mission of nuclear alert and B-52D consolidated training for SAC. The activation of the 4018th Combat Crew Training Squadron (4018th CCTS) at Carswell AFB, Texas, in April 1974, increased 7th BMW training responsibilities to include B-52D contingency tactics and certification of bomber and tanker instructor personnel. The wing received its first B-52H on 3 May 1982, and the last operational B-52D aircraft left the base on 20 February 1984. The 4018th CCTS was inactivated on 31 March 1984. On 24 July 1985, the 7th BMW received its first cruise missile integrated modified B-52H. The wing currently consists of two squadrons equipped with B-52H bomber aircraft and one squadron equipped with KC-135A tanker aircraft.

9th STRATEGIC RECONNAISSANCE WING
Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The wartime mission of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing (9th SRW) is to provide global aerial reconnaissance and air refueling support in accordance with provisions of the Emergency War Order (EWO). In peacetime, reconnaissance flights and reconnaissance air refueling support operations are conducted in response to the Peacetime Aerial Reconnaissance Program and contingency tasking from the National Command Authorities and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 9th SRW was activated on 1 August 1922, as the 9th Group (Observation) at Mitchell Field, New York. The group trained, took part in maneuvers, and participated in air shows from 1922 until 1940. The unit was originally equipped with B-10 and B-18 bombers in the late 1930s and early 1940s. In late 1940, the group moved to Panama to serve as part of the canal's defense force and performed antisubmarine operations in the Caribbean. The 9th, equipped with B-17, B-24, and B-26 aircraft, returned to the U.S. in 1942 to train cadres for bombardment units. In March 1944, the group was redesignated the 9th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and trained for combat with B-29 bombers. In November 1944, the group moved to the Pacific theater and supported Allied efforts in that area until the conclusion of the war. After the war, the 9th dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and took part in show-of-force missions over Japan. The unit was inactivated on Guam in October 1948. The 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing was activated on 1 May 1949, at Fairfield-Suisun AFB (later renamed Travis), California, where it conducted strategic reconnaissance from May 1949 until March 1950 with RB-17, RB-29 and RB-36 aircraft. On 2 October 1950, the wing was redesignated the 9th Bombardment Wing, Medium, and conducted strategic bombardment training and aerial refueling operations with B-47, KB-29, and KC-97 aircraft. The wing moved to Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, in May 1953. On 1 April 1962, the wing was redesignated the 9th Strategic Aerospace Wing to better describe its fixed bomber and missile force mission. The wing moved to Beale AFB, California, was redesignated the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing on 25 June 1966, and assumed its present strategic reconnaissance mission. The 9th SRW currently operates the SR-71A and U-2R reconnaissance missions from Beale AFB and four detachments located around the world. Its KC-135Q tankers from Beale AFB and two oversea locations operate as dedicated SR-71 refuelers, as well as supporting other refueling tasking. The wing also operates the only USAF training center for SR-71, U-2 and TR-1 crews.

11th STRATEGIC GROUP
Royal Air Force Fairford, United Kingdom
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To develop and maintain operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 11th Strategic Group's primary mission is to provide aerial refueling in support of the EWO. Its peacetime mission is to provide aerial refueling support for all U.S. Air Force operations, deployments, and redeployments, as well as participating in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) exercises.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 11th Strategic Group's history began on 1 October 1933, when it was activated as the 11th Observation Group. The group was redesignated the 11th Bombardment Group, Medium, in 1938 and finally activated in Hawaii on 1 February 1940. On 1 December 1940, it was redesignated the 11th Bombardment Group, Heavy, and flew patrol missions off Hawaii in B-17 bombers before and after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The 11th received the B-24 bomber and moved to New Herbrides in July 1942. From there, 11th aircraft struck airfields, supply dumps, ships, docks, troop positions, and other objectives in the South Pacific. The 11th received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for these operations. During the next two years, the group moved to Hawaii, Guam, and Okinawa to take part in the final phases of the air offensive against Japan. After the war, the 11th flew reconnaissance and surveillance missions to China and transported liberated prisoners of war from Okinawa to the Philippines. In April 1946, the group was redesignated the 11th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and equipped with B-29s, but training and operations terminated in October 1946. The 11th was inactivated in Guam on 20 October 1948. On 1 December 1948, the 11th was redesignated and activated as the 11th Bombardment Group, Heavy, at Carswell AFB, Texas. For the next three and one-half years, the 11th was assigned to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) and equipped with B-36 aircraft. The 11th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, was activated at Carswell AFB, Texas, on 16 February 1951. The 11th Bombardment Group, Heavy, was assigned to the 11th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, until the group was inactivated on 16 June 1952. The lineage and honors of the 11th Bombardment Group, Heavy, were temporarily bestowed on the 11th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, until the wing was inactivated on 25 March 1969. The wing was redesignated the 11th Strategic Aerospace Wing on 1 April 1962, 11th Air Refueling Wing on 2 July 1968, and inactivated on 25 March 1969- The 11th was redesignated the 11th Strategic Group (11th SG) and activated on 15 November 1978 at RAF Fairford, England, to provide aerial refueling for American and NATO aircraft involved in operations, deployments, and exercises in the European theater. Aircraft and crews deploy to RAF Fairford on a rotational basis from CONUS tanker wings. While at RAF Fairford, KC-135s are further deployed to SAC Elf One, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia or the 34th Strategic Squadron at Zaragoza AB, Spain.

17th RECONNAISSANCE WING
Royal Air Force Alconbury, United Kingdom
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 17th Reconnaissance Wing (17th RW) is to provide high-altitude, tactical surveillance in support of the United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies in the European Theater.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 17th Reconnaissance Wing was activated on 15 July 1931 as the 17th Pursuit Group at March Field, California. The group was redesignated the 17th Attack Group in 1935 and the 17th Bombardment Group (Medium) in 1939. From 1931 to 1939, the group trained and participated in maneuvers using P-12, P-26, A-17 and B-18 aircraft. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the unit used B-25s for patrol duty on the west coast and later patrolled the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic. In mid-1942, the group converted to B-26s and moved to North Africa where it began operations in December 1942. The group served in combat in the Mediterranean Theater throughout the war, flying interdiction and close-support missions. The group assisted in the disarmament of Germany after the war, but returned to the U.S. and was inactivated in November 1945. The group was activated but not operative from May 1947 to September 1948. The 17th Bombardment Wing, Light, was activated in May 1952 at Pusan-East AB, South Korea, where it conducted light bombardment interdiction and armed reconnaissance operations in B-26 aircraft until the armistice in July 1953. The wing moved to Japan in October 1954, where it trained for light bombardment. In March 1955, the wing was assigned to the Tactical Air Command (TAC) and moved to Hurlburt Field, Eglin AFB, Florida. The wing converted to B-57 and B-66 jet bombers in 1956. The 17th remained under TAC until it was inactivated in June 1958. In November 1962, the unit was redesignated as the 17th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, assigned to SAC and activated at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, where it replaced the 4043d Strategic Wing. While at this base, the 17th furnished B-52 aircrews and KC-135 aircraft and crews to SAC units involved in combat operations in Southeast Asia. In September 1975, the wing moved without people or equipment to Beale AFB, California, where it absorbed the resources of the 456th Bombardment Wing, including the B-52G and KC-135Q aircraft. At Beale AFB, the wing continued global strategic bombardment alert and used tanker aircraft primarily to refuel SR-71s until it was inactivated in September 1976. The 17th was redesignated the 17th Reconnaissance Wing and activated at RAF Alconbury, England, in October 1982. In 1983, the 17th became the first wing to be equipped with the TR-1 tactical reconnaissance aircraft.

19th AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 19th Air Refueling Wing (19th AREFW), Heavy, is to provide worldwide aerial refueling for strategic bombers, strategic airlift, tactical fighters, and air defense aircraft. In order to implement immediate and sustained long-range aerial refueling commensurate with the provisions of the Emergency War Order, aircrews and aircraft are on constant 24-hour alert. A second tasking, as directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), is to support the United States Central Command (USCENTCOM) by furnishing an EC-135 command control and communications aircraft. To meet the requirements of the USCENTCOM Staff, aircrews and maintenance personnel are on constant short notice standby to airlift the Staff to forward worldwide operating locations.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 19th Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, was activated on 18 October 1927, as the 19th Observation Group, an inactive unit of the Army Air Corps. In March 1932, the unit was activated at Rockwell Army Air Field, California, and redesignated the 19th Bombardment Group. During the fall of 1941, the group transferred to Clark Air Field, the Philippines, and was caught on the ground when the Japanese attacked the Philippines on 8 December 1941. Even though the group lost half of its B-17s in the Japanese raid, it flew the first United States bombardment mission against Japan on 10 December 1941. After months of flying missions against enemy positions, the group began getting B-17E Flying Fortresses to replace its lost B-17s. Transferred back to the United States in late 1942, the group operated a Combat Crew Training School at Pyote Army Air Field, Texas, until inactivated and activated on 1 April 1944 as the 19th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy. After training in the B-29, the group reentered the war in the Pacific in early 1945 and flew missions against targets on the Japanese islands. Having flown the first bombardment mission of World War II, the 19th also flew on the last bombardment mission against Japan. After the war, the 19th remained on Guam as a peacekeeper force in the Pacific. The 19th Bombardment Wing, Medium, was activated on 17 August 1948, at Andersen AFB, Guam. Since the 19th Bombardment Group was a component of the wing, the history and honors of the group were temporarily bestowed on the wing when the group was subsequently inactivated. On 28 June 1950, the 19th again flew the first United States bombardment mission against an enemy, this time against the Communist forces in Korea. During 37 months of conflict, the 19th flew mostly low-altitude attacks on small targets throughout Korea. At the conclusion of Korean hostilities, the wing moved to Pinecastle AFB, Florida, after almost nine years overseas. The wing transitioned to B-47 jet bombers and became a Strategic Air Command (SAC) combat unit in 1955. The 19th acquired an air refueling mission with KC-97s and moved to Homestead AFB, Florida, in 1956. The wing was redesignated the 19th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 July 1961, and converted to the B-52 Bomber and KC-135 tanker in 1962. In July 1968, the wing moved to Robins AFB, Georgia. During the Vietnam conflict, the 19th provided aircraft and personnel to support combat operations throughout Southeast Asia. On 1 October 1983, the wing lost its bomber mission and was redesignated as the 19th Air Refueling Wing, Heavy. The wing is currently assigned two operational KC-135R tanker squadrons.

22d AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
March Air Force Base, Riverside, California
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 22d Air Refueling Wing (22d AREFW) is to develop and maintain the capability to conduct air refueling operations in support of National Command objectives in any part of the world, under any climatic conditions. It operates in that role as part of the Strategic Air Command's commitment to world peace through readiness and the deterrence of armed aggression. This commitment also includes supporting the Department of Defense in many contingency situations, such as strategic force projection and strategic force mobility.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 22d Air Refueling Wing was activated on 1 August 1948 as the 22d Bombardment Wing, Medium, at Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas, but was nonoperational. In 1949, the wing moved to March AFB, California, where it became operational and trained in global strategic bombardment. Aerial refueling was added to the wing's mission in 1952. In 1963, the wing converted to B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers. From 1963 until 1970, the wing supported Fifteenth Air Force's post attack command and control system with EC-135 aircraft. The 22d was known as a "super" wing from 1966 to 1971 because it contained two bombardment and two tanker squadrons. During the Vietnam era, the wing supported Strategic Air Command (SAC) operations in the Far East. During this period, all of the wing's bomber and tanker resources were loaned to other organizations for combat and contingency operations. The wing lost its bombardment mission and was redesignated the 22d Air Refueling Wing on 1 October 1982. The first KC-10 aircraft arrived the same day. The wing currently consists of one KC-135 tanker squadron and one KC-10 tanker squadron.

28th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Ellsworth Air Force Base, Rapid City, South Dakota
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 28th Bombardment Wing (28th BMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to participate in strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order and to support other Strategic Air Command (SAC) taskings as required. Additionally, the wing is preparing to assume a conventional weapons capability with the B-1B bomber. To fulfill its varied mission, the wing maintains two squadrons of B-1B bombers, one of KC-135R tankers, and one of EC-135 aircraft fitted with specialized communications equipment.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 28th Bombardment Wing was originally activated as the 28th Composite Group in February 1940, as part of the expansion program undertaken by the Army Air Corps after the outbreak of war in Europe. The 28th moved to Alaska to reinforce units from February 1941 until after the war. The group served as part of the defense system for the region and flew bombing and photographic reconnaissance missions until it was inactivated in October 1945. The group was reactivated with B-29 aircraft in August 1946 and was redesignated as the 28th Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, in August 1947. The 28th was discontinued, redesignated and activated as the 28th Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 12 July 1948. It was redesignated the 28th Bombardment Wing Heavy, on 16 May 1949, and converted to the B-36 bomber. The wing was redesignated the 28th Reconnaissance Wing on 1 April 1950, performing the global strategic reconnaissance mission. In late 1954, the wing was again assigned a bombardment mission and was redesignated the 28th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 October 1955. In 1957, the wing converted from the B-36 to the B-52 bomber. The 28th acquired an aerial refueling mission in 1959 and became responsible for operating a Post Attack Command Control System (PACCS) in 1965. During several periods of SAC operations in Southeast Asia, the wing was integrated into SAC's combat forces for bombing missions in South Vietnam. At other times, most of the wing's aircraft and crews were on loan to other SAC organizations involved in combat operations. After 1975, the wing resumed its peace-time mission of strategic deterrence. The wing received the newly modified Offensive Avionics System (OAS) equipped B-52Hs in 1983. In 1986, the 28th finished converting from the KC-135A to the KC-135R tanker. The last B-52H departed in 1986 and the first B-1B bomber arrived in 1987- The 28th BMW assumed its initial alert commitment with the B-1B in August 1987. The wing currently has two squadrons of the B-1B bomber and one squadron each of the KC-135R and EC-135A/C/G aircraft.

42d BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 42d Bombardment Wing (42d BMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO) as specifically outlined in the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 42d Bombardment Wing was activated at Fort Douglas, Utah, in January 1941, as the 42d Bombardment Group, Medium. The group received its first B-26 aircraft in October 1941, while the unit was stationed at Gower Field, Idaho. In June 1942, the group moved to McChord Field, Washington, where it patrolled the Northwest Pacific coast and trained in B-25 bombers. The group moved to the Pacific Theater in April 1943, and operated from several different stations while attacking Japanese airfields, personnel areas, and shipping. The 42d also flew photographic reconnaissace missions from New Guinea and Morotal. The group's final combat mission was an attack on isolated Japanese units on Luzon in August 1945. After the war, the 42d ferried troops and equipment to Manila until it was moved to Japan in January 1946 as part of the occupation force. The group was inactivated in Japan in May 1946. The 42d BMW was activated at Limestone (later Loring) AFB Maine, on 25 February 1953, with only a bombardment mission, but an aerial refueling mission was added in 1955. The wing converted from B-36 to B-52 bombers in 1956. In 1959, the wing lost one of its three bombardment squadrons and another one in 1966, but gained a second air refueling squadron in 1968. During Strategic Air Command operations in Southeast Asia, the wing supported bombardment and air refueling operations by furnishing aircraft, aircrews and support personnel to other units. The wing currently consists of one squadron of B-52G aircraft and two squadrons of KC-135A aircraft.

43d BOMBARDMENT WING
Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 43d Bombardment Wing (43d BMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). This mission is accomplished with assigned B-52 aircraft and KC-135 tankers on temporary duty from other Strategic Air Command (SAC) units.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 43d Bombardment Wing was activated as the 43d Bombardment Group, Heavy, on 15 January 1941, at Langley Field, Virginia. The unit moved to Bangor, Maine, on 28 August 1941, where it flew antisubmarine patrols along the New England coast. In February 1942, the group moved to the Southwest Pacific to support Allied operations in that area. The group was first equipped with B-17 bombers, but converted to the B-24 in 1943. The group flew its last combat mission from the Philippines and was inactivated on 29 April 1946. The unit was activated on 1 October 1946 at Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, and was redesignated the 43d Bombardment Wing, Medium, in 1948. The unit flew B-29 bombers until converting to B-50 aircraft. The wing added a refueling mission in 1949 with KB-29 and, later, KC-97 aircraft. The unit set several flight records, including the first around-the-world flight of a combat aircraft, the B-50 "Lucky Lady II," in 1949 and a jet endurance record in 1954 for keeping a B-47 airborne for 47:35 hours. The wing converted to B-58 aircraft in 1960, conducting evaluations of the new supersonic bomber while operating a combat crew training school on the B-58 weapon system for SAC aircrews. The wing conducted B-58 evaluations until July 1962 and served as one of two SAC B-58 wings with a strategic bombing mission until late 1969. The wing also controlled an air refueling squadron from 1964 until 1970. In the 1960s, the wing established many flight records with the B-58. The 43d was inactivated on 31 January 1970, redesignated the 43d Strategic Wing on 4 February 1970 and activated on 1 April 1970 as a replacement for the 3960th Strategic Wing at Andersen AFB, Guam. From July until mid-August 1970 and from February 1972 until August 1973, the 43d employed attached aircraft and aircrews from other SAC units to participate in SAC Arc Light combat missions in Southeast Asia. In 1975, the wing provided logistical and medical support to thousands of Vietnamese refugees evacuated from their homeland and located temporarily at Guam while awaiting resettlement. The wing's B-52 bombers achieved operational capability with the Harpoon antiship missile in June 1985. The 43d was redesignated the 43d Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 4 November 1986. Currently, the 43d provides training and performs ground alert with assigned B-52G aircraft and with KC-135A/R and KC-10 aircraft assigned on temporary duty from other SAC units.

44th STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN
Ellsworth Air Force Base, Rapid City, South Dakota
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 44th Strategic Missile Wing (44th SMW) is to operate and maintain its 150 Minuteman II Ballistic Missiles in a constant state of readiness in support of the nation's strategic deterrent posture.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 44th Strategic Missile Wing was activated on 15 January 1941, as the 44th Bombardment Group, Heavy, at MacDill Field, Florida. The group trained in B-24 bombers and flew antisubmarine missions in the American theater. The group moved to England in August 1942 and flew missions against strategic targets in Europe. In late June 1943, a large detachment of the 44th moved to North Africa to take part in the invasion of Sicily. The entire group reassembled in England in October 1943 and carried out operations in Western Europe from November 1943 until April 1945. The group returned to the U.S. in June 1945, was equipped with B-29 Superfortresses and moved to Sioux Falls Army Air Field, South Dakota. The 44th moved to Great Bend Army Air Field, Kansas, on 14 December 1945 and was assigned to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) in March of 1946. In July 1947, the 44th moved to Andrews Field, Maryland, but had no personnel or operational mission until it was inactived on 6 September 1948. On 2 January 1951, the unit was activated and redesignated the 44th Bombardment Wing, Medium, at March AFB, California, and was assigned B-29 bombers. The 44th moved to Lake Charles (later renamed Chennault) AFB, Louisiana, on 1 August 1951, and served as an operational training unit for B-29 aircrews and maintenance personnel for Far East Air Forces. In August 1952, the 44th converted to the B-47 Stratojet and gained a KC-97 air refueling mission in 1953. The 44th Bombardment Wing was discontinued on 15 June 1960, but was redesignated the 44th Strategic Missile Wing on 24 November 1961. The 44th SMW was organized on 1 January 1962, at Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, with one Titan I missile squadron, but converted to the Minuteman I in 1963 and the Minuteman II in 1972. The 44th SMW is currently assigned three operational missile squadrons and is responsible for 150 Minuteman II missiles dispersed throughout central and western South Dakota, encompassing an area of 13,500 square miles.

55th STRATEGIC RECONNAISSANCE WING
Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha, Nebraska
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing (55th SRW) is to develop and maintain the operational capabilities to permit the conduct of strategic warfare in accordance with the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 55th SRW has specific missions that distinguish it from other Strategic Air Command (SAC) wings. These missions task the wing to: conduct global-scale strategic reconnaissance; operate, maintain, and support the Strategic Air Command Airborne Command Post in a continuous operation; conduct airborne and ground alert operations necessary to continuously support the National Emergency Airborne Command Post; support the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force (RDJTF) through participation in the SAC Strategic Projection Force; operate, maintain, and conduct command support airlift missions; and provide aerial refueling receiver training for RC-, EC- and KC-135 missions.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing was activated on 15 January 1941, as the 55th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) at Hamilton Field, California, where it commenced training with P-43 aircraft. In May 1942, the unit was redesignated the 55th Fighter Group and converted to P-38 aircraft in preparation for oversea duty. In August 1943, the group moved to England and began combat operations in October 1943, primarily escorting bombers in support of Allied operations in Europe. The group converted to the P-51 in July 1944. The group flew its last combat mission in April 1945 and moved to Germany in July 1945 as part of the occupation forces. The group was inactivated in Germany in August 1946. In February 1947, the group was activated as the 55th Reconnaissance Group (Very Long Range, Mapping) at MacDill Field, Florida, and assigned C-45, RB-17, and RB-29 aircraft. On 19 July 1948, the group was redesignated the 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Group and transferred to Topeka (later renamed Forbes) AFB, Kansas. The group was inactivated on 14 October 1949, only to be redesignated the 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Medium, on 27 October 1950, and activated at Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico, on 1 November 1950. From 1950 until 1954, the wing performed strategic reconnaissance, charting photography, precise electronic geodetic mapping, and electronic reconnaissance using primarily RB-29, RB-50, and C-82 aircraft. In October 1952, the wing returned to Forbes AFB, Kansas. When mapping and charting functions were transferred in May 1954, the wing assumed a global strategic reconnaissance mission—including electronic reconnaissance, weather reconnaissance until June 1963 and photographic reconnaissance until May 1964. During this period, the wing employed the RB-47 aircraft. From August 1964 until March 1965, the wing controlled an Atlas missile complex. In 1966, the wing moved to Offutt AFB, Nebraska, and acquired the SAC airborne command post and post attack command and control operations. The wing became responsible for SAC logistic support missions in September 1971 and for the Advanced Airborne Command Post in November 1975. The 1st Airborne Command Control Squadron and its compliment of E-4A aircraft transferred to the 55th SRW on 1 November 1975, bringing with it the National Emergency Airborne Command Post (NEACP) mission. On 1 March 1986, the 55th SRW became the host wing for all units assigned to Offutt AFB, including SAC Headquarters and the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff (JSTPS). The 55th SRW is currently assigned four operational squadrons equipped with EC-135C, RC-135U/V/W, C-135A, KC-135E, E-4B, NKC/135A aircraft.

68th AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
Seymour Johnson AFB, Goldsboro, North Carolina
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 68th Air Refueling Wing (68th AREFW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to project power through enhanced global mobility. This is accomplished through the organization and training of a force that could provide simultaneous air refueling and airlift requirements for long-range deployment of tactical fighter forces, support for air refueling requirements of strategic airlift aircraft, and augmentation of airlift forces between aerial ports.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 68th Air Refueling Wing was originally established as the 68th Observation Group in Brownwood, Texas, on 1 September 1941. Its primary mission was observation aircraft training and antisubmarine patrols. The group moved to several different U.S. locations in preparation for oversea deployment in 1942. The 68th split into a number of different elements beginning on 22 September 1942. One section moved by ship to England, and then to the invasion of North Africa, while another large section moved directly to North Africa. The group movement finally ended on 2 January 1943, when all of its elements united at Oujda, French Morocco. From here, the group engaged in intensive training and flew antisubmarine patrols in western Mediterranean waters. Late in March 1943, the 68th moved to Beerechid Airfield and trained P-38 and P-39 pilots. On 26 October 1943, the group moved to Massicault Airdrome, Tunisia, where it became little more than a skeleton force.

After a move to Blida, Algeria, on 15 June 1944, the group was disestablished. The 68th was redesignated the 68th Reconnaissance Group on 10 March 1947, as a Reserve unit at Hamilton Field, California. The 68th was inactivated on 27 June 1949, due to a reorganization of the Reserve program. On 10 October 1951, the 68th was activated as the 68th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Medium, at Lake Charles (later renamed Chennault) AFB, Louisiana, with the 68th group as a paper element of the wing. The wing assumed the lineage and honors of the group when it was inactivated on 16 June 1952. The wing was redesignated the 68th Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 16 June 1952. During 1953, the 68th converted from the B-29 to the B-47 bomber. A KC-97 tanker squadron was assigned in November 1953. By May 1954, the 68th was combat ready with bombers and tankers. The refueling squadron was transferred out of the wing in September 1957. From June 1958 until February 1963, a Reflex Action alert force of the 68th operated from Fairford RAF Station, England, and Sidi Slimane AB, Morocco. The B-47 bomber was phased out of the wing beginning in January 1963. On 15 April 1963, the wing was redesignated the 68th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, moved to Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina, and operated as a B-52/KC-135 equipped combat wing. From 1966 until 1973, the 68th furnished KC-135 aircraft, KC-135 and B-52 aircrews, and support personnel to other SAC organizations involved in the conflict in Southeast Asia. The B-52 was phased out in 1982. On 30 September 1982, the 68th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, was inactivated and the 68th Air Refueling Group, Heavy, was activated. On 1 October 1982, the 68th Air Refueling Group, Heavy, and the 68th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, were consolidated into a single organization. The 68th Group flew KC-135 tankers until 1 October 1985, when it converted to the bigger, more modern and versatile KC-10 tanker. The 68th was redesignated the 68th Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, on 1 October 1986. The 68th is currently assigned two KC-10A tanker squadrons.

90th STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN/PEACEKEEPER
Francis E. Warren Air Force Base, Cheyenne, Wyoming
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 90th Strategic Missile Wing (90th SMW) is to maintain an operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Single Integrated Operations Plan (SIOP). The 90th SMW maintains its 20 launch control facilities and 200 Minuteman III and Peacekeeper launch facilities in strategic readiness.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 90th Strategic Missile Wing was activated on 15 April 1942, as the 90th Bombardment Group, Heavy, at Key Field, Mississippi. The group initially trained for combat with B-24 bombers and moved to Hawaii in September 1942. From November 1942 until January 1945, the group operated from Australia, New Guinea, and Biak in support of Allied operations in that area. The group moved to the Philippines in January 1945 and flew missions over the Asiatic mainland. After the war, the group flew reconnaissance missions over Japan and ferried Allied prisoners from Okinawa to Manila until it was inactivated on 27 January 1946. The group was redesignated the 90th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, activated on 1 July 1947, and assigned to the Strategic Air Command (SAC). It was probably not manned during 1947 and 1948 and was finally inactivated on 6 September 1948. The 90th was redesignated the 90th Bombardment Wing, Medium, activated on 2 January 1951 at Fairchild AFB, Washington, and moved to Forbes AFB, Kansas, on 5 March 1951. From May 1951 until September 1952, the 90th served as an operational training unit for B-29 aircrews and mechanics from other wings. The 90th was also a replacement training unit for B-29 and RB-29 aircrews for Far East Air Forces from 1951 until 1953. On 16 June 1952, the 90th was redesignated the 90th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Medium, but did not change its combat mission from bombardment to reconnaissance until September 1953. It was assigned a strategic reconnaissance and air refueling mission with RB-47 reconnaissance and KC-97 tanker aircraft. In 1958, the wing became an RB-47 combat crew training wing, a mission that it retained until it was discontinued on 20 June 1960. On 21 February 1963, the wing was organized as the 90th Strategic Missile Wing and activated at Francis E. Warren AFB, Wyoming, on 1 July 1963. The 90th was initially assigned Minuteman I missiles, but converted to the Minuteman III in 1973. In December 1986, the 90th achieved Initial Operating Capability for the Peacekeeper missile. The wing currently is assigned four operational missile squadrons and is responsible for 200 Minuteman III and Peacekeeper missiles controlled from 20 launch control centers. These facilities are dispersed throughout a 12,600 square mile area of northeastern Colorado, southwestern Nebraska, and southeastern Wyoming.

91st STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN
Minot Air Force Base, Minot, North Dakota
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 91st Strategic Missile Wing (91st SMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 91st SMW operates and maintains 150 Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) in strategic readiness.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 91st Strategic Missile Wing was activated as the 91st Bombardment Group, Heavy, on 15 April 1942 at Harding Field, Louisiana. The group moved to England in August 1942 and entered combat in November 1942. The 91st was part of the historic operation that bombed Germany for the first time on 27 January 1943. Besides numerous bombing missions against German targets, the 91st provided support for the D-Day invasion at Omaha Beach, the St Lo breakthrough, and the Battle of the Bulge. After the war ended, the group evacuated prisoners from German camps before returning to the U.S. in June 1945 and subsequent inac-tivation in November 1945. On 1 July 1947, the group was designated the 91st Reconnaissance Group and activated at Andrews Field, Maryland, as part of the Strategic Air Command. The group was redesignated the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Group and moved to McGuire AFB, New Jersey, as a component of the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing (91st SRW) when it activated on 10 November 1948. The 91st SRW was temporarily bestowed the history and honors of the group after the group was inactivated on 28 May 1952. The 91st SRW performed global strategic reconnaissance from 1948 until 1957 and aerial refueling from 1950 until 1957. The wing's headquarters integrated with the headquarters of the 301st Bombardment Wing from April 1950 until February 1951, although each wing continued independent tactical operations. Frequently during the 1950s, the wing maintained operational detachments of aircraft and crews drawn from several components to provide reconnaissance support in oversea areas. The wing was inactivated on 8 November 1957 but activated and organized as the 91st Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 February 1963 at Glasgow AFB, Montana, to train for global bombardment and aerial refueling with the B-52 and KC-135 aircraft. Except for a small rear echelon, wing aircraft and personnel deployed to the western Pacific to support combat operations in Southeast Asia from September 1966 to March 1967. From February to April 1968, the 91st deployed to Okinawa in response to the North Korean seizure of the USS PUEBLO. On 25 June 1968, the wing was redesignated the 91st Strategic Missile Wing and moved to Minot AFB, North Dakota, and assumed the history and honors of the 455th Strategic Missile Wing. The wing was initially equipped with the Minuteman I, but became the first missile wing equipped with the Minuteman III. The wing currently is assigned three operational missile squadrons and is responsible for 150 Minuteman III ICBMs.

92d BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Fairchild Air Force Base, Spokane, Washington
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 92d Bombardment Wing (92d BMW) is to maintain assigned units in a state of readiness to allow immediate operation against United States adversaries. The wing is prepared to perform tasks designated in Emergency War Orders (EWO) and related operations orders. Bombardment and air refueling crews assigned to the 92d BMW train to perform global bombardment. Additionally, the 92d BMW provides support to all tenant units.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 92d Bombardment Wing was activated as the 92d Bombardment Group in March 1942 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. In mid 1942, the group moved to England to fly combat missions in its B-17 bombers. It remained in the European theater to support Allied operations until it was inactivated in France in February 1946, after flying 310 combat missions. In August 1946, the group was reactivated, assigned to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) with B-29 bombers, and moved to Spokane (later renamed Fairchild) AFB in 1947. In 1950, in preparation to receive the B-36 bomber, the group was redesignated the 92d Bombardment Wing, Heavy. The wing converted to B-52s in 1956, and added an air refueling capability in 1957. In its first year with KC-135 tanker, the 92d Air Refueling Squadron crews shattered seven world speed records. In January 1958, Fairchild assumed its first alert under the auspices of operation Fireball. In 1960, with the activation of the 567th Strategic Missile Squadron, Fairchild became the first Air Force unit to include both manned aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) in the same wing. On 15 February 1962, the wing was redesignated as the 92d Strategic Aerospace Wing, emphasizing the growing role it played in the aerospace age. Even though the Atlas missiles were retired in 1965, the wing's name remained the same until 1972, when it was redesignated the 92d BMW. From 1965 to 1975, the 92d supported SAC activities in Southeast Asia by deploying bombers, tankers, and aircrews. In 1983, the 92d was notified it would be one of the first wings in SAC to receive the Air Launched Cruise Missiles (ALCMs). In September 1985, Fairchild began its conversion from B-52 "G" to newer "H" model aircraft. Two months later, a decentralized maintenance concept, Readiness Oriented Logistics System (ROLS), began at Fairchild, the base chosen as the command test bed. In October 1986, Fairchild made history as the first wing ever to win nine out of a possible 11 trophies at the SAC Bombing and Navigation competition. The wing currently consists of one squadron of B-52H bombers and two squadrons of KC-135A tankers.

93d BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Castle Air Force Base, Atwater, California
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The 93d Bombardment Wing (93d BMW) has a dual mission. The wing's primary mission is to maintain the capability to conduct global strategic warfare fulfilling Emergency War Order (EWO) taskings from the Strategic Air Command (SAC). In addition, the wing is charged with the mission of aircrew training for all SAC B-52 and KC-135 crewmembers.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 93d Bombardment Wing was activated as the 93d Bombardment Group in March 1942 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. Moved to Florida for training with the B-24 bomber, the wing also engaged in antisubmarine operations over the Gulf of Mexico. In August 1942, the group moved to England, where it entered combat in support of Allied operations in the European theater. The group remained in England throughout the war except for two deployments of some of the group's resources to North Africa. At the conclusion of the war, the group boasted 396 combat missions, having flown more missions and traveled more than any other Eighth Air Force group. The group returned to the U.S. in 1945, was assigned to SAC, and trained in B-29 and then in B-50 bombers. In July 1947, the 93d Bombardment Wing was activated and in 1954 inherited the history of the group, which inactivated in 1952. The wing acquired an aerial refueling mission in 1950 and was the first SAC unit to convert to B-52 aircraft in 1955. In 1956, the 93d BMW became SAC's primary B-52 aircrew training organization, adding KC-135 aircrew training in mid-1956. One of the wing's B-52s became the first jet aircraft to fly nonstop around-the-world in 1957. From 1968 to 1974, in addition to its operational commitments and its other training responsibilities, the wing operated a special B-52 replacement training unit to support SAC's B-52 operations in Southeast Asia. In late 1986, the 93d BMW received its first KC-135R, a re-engined, more powerful version of the KC-135A. Combat crew training for the KC-135R aircraft also became a responsibility for 93d BMW personnel. Currently, the wing's B-52 squadron and first KC-135 squadron are primarily tasked to train combat aircrews while its second KC-135 squadron is tasked with tactical functions.

96th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Dyess Air Force Base, Abilene, Texas
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The 96th Bombardment Wing (96th BMW) must develop and maintain an operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). To perform this mission, the wing must organize and train a force capable of immediate and sustained long-range offensive bombardment and air-to-air refueling operations on a global scale, using the latest technical knowledge, advanced weapons, and procedures. In addition, the wing must be prepared to perform those tasks assigned in current emergency plans and related operations orders.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 96th Bombardment Wing was activated as the 96th Bombardment Group, Heavy, in July 1942, at Salt Lake City Army Air Field, Utah. The group trained with B-17s and served as an operational training unit. The group moved to England in April 1943 and entered combat in May 1943. It functioned primarily as a strategic bombardment organization throughout the war. During May 1945, the wing flew five "Chow Hound" missions, dropping tons of food to hungry people in Holland. The unit returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 21 December 1945. The 96th was redesignated 96th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and activated as a Reserve unit on 29 May 1947 at Gunter AFB, Alabama, where it remained until it was inactivated on 27 June 1949. Although activated as the 92d Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 18 November 1953 at Altus AFB, Oklahoma, the unit was not manned until March 1954, when it began air refueling operations with KC-97 tankers. Bombardment training was added in April 1955 with B-47 bomber aircraft. In September 1957, the wing moved to Dyess AFB, Texas. From 1959 to 1961, the 96th also controlled a C-124 squadron which provided strategic airlift support to SAC organizations. The wing gained an Atlas Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) squadron in July, 1961, which it retained until the Atlas was retired in 1965. On 1 April 1962, the 96th was redesignated the 96th Strategic Aerospace Wing. The wing converted from B-47 to B-52 bombers in 1963 and acquired KC-135 tankers in 1965. Several times from 1970 until 1973, all of the wing's aircraft, crews, and most of its support personnel were loaned to SAC organizations based in the Pacific or Southeast Asia to support combat operations in that area. On 31 March 1972, the 96th was redesignated the 96th Bombardment Wing, Heavy. The wing converted from the B-52D to the B-52H in 1982 and on 29 June 1985, became the first Air Force unit to receive the B-1B bomber. The 4018th Combat Crew Training Squadron (later redesignated the 338th Combat Crew Training Squadron) was activated as a component of the 96th on 15 March 1985, to conduct initial B-1B instruction and certification. The first B-1B was put on alert on 1 September 1986. The 96th BMW currently consists of one KC-135A tanker and one B-1B bomber squadron.

97th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Eaker Air Force Base, Blytheville,
Arkansas Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 97th Bombardment Wing (97th BMW) is to maintain the capability to conduct strategic bombardment operations on a global scale, either independently or in cooperation with land and sea forces and to provide refueling support in any area directed by higher headquarters. The 97th BMW also maintains a force of bombers and tankers on continuous alert ready to launch at a moment's notice against any potential adversaries of the United States or her allies.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 97 Bombardment Wing was activated as the 97th Bombardment Group, Heavy, in January 1942 at MacDill Field, Florida. The unit trained with B-17s, moved to England and entered combat in August 1942. The group flew the first mission flown by Army Air Force heavy bombers based in England. In November 1942, the group moved to Algeria and became the first heavy bomb group to operate from Africa. The group moved to Italy in late 1943 where it remained until it was inactivated in October 1945 after 483 combat missions. The group was activated at Smoky Hill Army Air Field, Kansas, in August 1946 and equipped with B-29s. The group became a component of the 97th Bombardment Wing and moved to Biggs AFB, Texas, in May 1948. The wing acquired a refueling mission in early 1950 with KB-29 aircraft and an electronic reconnaissance mission in 1954 with ERB-29A and RB-50G/E aircraft. The reconnaissance mission was transferred in 1956, but the 97th continued bombardment and air refueling missions. In 1950, the wing converted to B-50 bombers and to KC-97 tankers in 1954. The wing became a jet force in 1955 when its B-50s were replaced with B-47 jet bombers. The wing phased down for inactivation at Biggs AFB in December 1958 and became nonoperational in January 1959, but moved to Blytheville (later renamed Eaker) AFB, Arkansas, in July 1959. It was reequipped with B-52s and with KC-135s in 1961. During the Vietnam era, the wing supported SAC combat operations in Southeast Asia by furnishing aircraft and crews to other SAC organizations in the Pacific. At times during this period, all of the wing's B-52 bomber and aircrews were on temporary duty in the Pacific. The 97th acquired the Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) in 1984. Currently, the wing consists of one squadron equipped with B-52G bomber aircraft and one squadron equipped with KC-135A aircraft.

301st AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
Malmstrom Air Force Base, Great Falls, Montana
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 301st Air Refueling Wing (301st AREFW), Heavy, is to develop and maintain the capability to conduct air refueling operations in support of National Command objectives in any part of the world. This commitment includes supporting the Strategic Air Command's Emergency War Order (EWO) and supporting the Department of Defense in contingency situations requiring strategic force projection and strategic force mobility.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 301st Air Refueling Wing, is temporarily bestowed the lineage and honors of the 301st Bombardment Group. The 301st Bombardment Group was organized on 28 January 1942, and was one of the first American bombardment groups to fly missions against German forces in August 1942. During World War II, the group's bombers hit targets in France, Germany, North Africa, and Italy and received two Distinguished Unit Citations for its operations over Tunisia and Regensburg, Germany. After flying over 400 combat missions, the 301st returned to America in July 1945 and was inactivated at Pyote Army Air Field on 15 October 1945. The group was reactivated at Smokey Hill AFB, Kansas on 4 August 1946 and flew B-29 and B-47 bombers until it was inactivated at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, on 16 June 1952. The 301st Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, was established on 15 October 1947, at Smokey Hill AFB, Kansas. It was redesignated the 301st Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 12 July 1947, and moved to Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, in November 1949. The 301st gained an air refueling mission in 1949 when a KC-97 equipped air refueling squadron was assigned. The principal mission of the wing, however, was strategic bombardment, which required it to deploy to England from December 1952 until March 1953 and to French Morocco from February until April 1954. The wing was equipped with B-29 aircraft until it converted to the B-47 in 1956. In 1958, the 301st moved to Lockbourne AFB, Ohio (later renamed Rickenbacker AFB), and gained another major mission as an electronic countermeasures unit. On 15 June 1964 the wing was redesignated the 301st Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, and lost all its other missions. It was equipped with KC-135 aircraft and was SAC's first all jet air refueling wing. From 3 March 1965 to 30 June 1966, the wing had EC-135 aircraft for relaying communications as part of SAC's Post Attack Command and Control System. The air refueling mission not only provided alert tankers in support of SAC's general war mission but also supported numerous SAC and TAC exercises. The 301st provided crews and aircraft for temporary operations to Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War era. On 10 June 1972, most of the 301st staff, maintenance and support personnel and all of the tactical aircraft and crews deployed to Thailand to become part of a provisional unit. A contingent remained at Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, to provide administrative support. After wing personnel returned from Thailand in 1972, the wing continued to fulfill its mission to provide alert aircraft for SAC, as well as providing worldwide air refueling support to other Air Force units until it was inactivated at Rickenbacker AFB, Ohio, on 30 September 1979. The 301st was redesignated the 301st Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, activated at Malmstrom AFB, Montana, on 5 January 1988, and assigned KC-135 aircraft.

305th AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
Grissom Air Force Base, Peru, Indiana
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The 305th Air Refueling Wing (305th AREFW) conducts global air refueling operations in support of the Strategic Air Command's Single Integrated Operational Plan and higher headquarters contingency plans. The 305th AREFW also maintains an airborne radio relay link as an element of the Post Attack Command Control System (PACCS).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 305th Air Refueling Wing was activated as the 305th Bombardment Group, Heavy, on 1 March 1942, at Salt Lake Army Air Base, Utah. It was one of the first B-17 equipped units to be deployed to England in World War II. The 305th flew its first combat mission on 17 November 1942. Under the command of Colonel Curtis E. LeMay, the 305th played an important role in World War II. It won a Distinguished Unit Citation for action in France on April 4, 1943, and another for action in Germany on January 11, 1944. After the fighting in Europe ended, the 305th was an occupation force in Germany until it was inactivated on 25 December 1946. The 305th was activated as the 305th Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 2 January 1951, at MacDill AFB, Florida. Its initial mission was to conduct strategic bombardment training, but a refueling mission was added in July 1951. The wing converted from B-29 to B-47 bombers in late 1952. Two of the wing's B-47s set speed records in 1953 when one flew from Goose Bay, Labrador, to Fairford RAF Station, England, in 4:14 hours, and the other from Limestone, Maine, to Fairford RAF Station in 4:45 hours. In June 1959, the wing moved to Bunker Hill (later, Grissom) AFB, Indiana. The wing converted from KC-97 tankers to KC-135 tankers in 1959 and from B-47 to B/TB-58 bombers in 1961. A 305th bomber set a new speed record in 1963 by flying from Tokyo, Japan, to London, England (via Alaska and Greenland), in 8:35 hours at an average speed of 938 mph. From 1965 to 1969, the wing operated a combat crew training school and in mid-1966 it gained an EC-135 PACCS mission. On 1 January 1970, the 305th was redesignated the 305th Air Refueling Wing, lost all of its bombardment units, but continued air refueling and PACCS support. The 305th AREFW is currently assigned KC-135 and EC-135 aircraft.

306th STRATEGIC WING
Royal Air Force Mildenhall, England
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 306th Strategic Wing (306th SW) is to develop and maintain operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO) and under conditions of contingency operations. Also, the 306th SW assures the capability to conduct assigned strategic reconnaissance and air refueling as tasked. During peacetime, the 306th SW provides air refueling and reconnaissance support as tasked by higher headquarters. The 306th SW also provides operational support for the European Tanker Task Force, reconnaissance and intelligence, and reconnaissance refueling, as well as several specialized missions.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 306th Strategic Wing was activated as the 306th Bombardment Group (Heavy), on 1 March 1942 at Gowen Field, Idaho. The group trained in B-17s in preparation for combat in Europe. In September 1942, the wing moved to England where it began operations against strategic targets in the European Theater. Group aircraft took part in the first penetration into Germany by heavy bombers in January 1943. The unit remained in the European theater after V-E Day as part of United States Air Forces in Europe and engaged in special photographic mapping duty in western Europe and north Africa. The group was inactivated on 25 December 1946. The 306th was activated in July 1947 as the 306th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, at Andrews Field, Maryland. In August 1948, the group was redesignated the 306th Bombardment Group, Medium, and equipped with B-29 bombers. The group moved to MacDill AFB, Florida, and was equipped with B-29 aircraft. In September 1950, the 306th Bombardment Wing was activated, with the 306th Bombardment Group, Medium, as one of its components, and started its transition to the B-47 jet bomber. It became the first SAC wing fully equipped with B-47. The wing was temporarily bestowed the history and honors of the 306th Bombardment Group when the group was inactivated on 16 June 1952. In 1963, the wing moved to McCoy AFB, Florida, and converted to B-52 and KC-135 aircraft. From 1965 until 1973, the wing supported Southeast Asia and Pacific operations on a regular basis. The 306th inactivated on 1 July 1974. On 14 August 1976, the wing was activated as the 306th Strategic Wing at Ramstein AB, Germany, and replaced the 98th Strategic Wing with an air refueling and reconnaissance mission. The wing moved to RAF Mildenhall, England, on 1 July 1978. In April 1986, the 306th played a major role in the success of Eldorado Canyon, the American attack on the Libyan capital of Tripoli. In support of this 14-hour, radio-silence rendezvous mission, the unit deployed the largest number of refueling aircraft ever flown over Europe and the largest fleet of KC-10s ever airborne at one time. Currently, the 306th operates with two assigned squadrons: the 922d Strategic Squadron at Hellenikon AB, Greece, assigned daily reconnaissance sortie tasking; and Det 1, 306th SW, Keflavik, Iceland, flying tanker support for the area. These squadrons, respectively, use RC-135 and KC-135R aircraft and crews which are provided on a rotational, temporary basis from other SAC units.

319th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Grand Forks Air Force Base, Grand Forks, North Dakota
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 319th Bombardment Wing (319th BMW) is to maintain combat-ready aircraft and aircrews in a constant state of readiness to support SAC's commitment to maintain the strength of its deterrent force. The wing must be capable of conducting long-range bombardment, sustained and effective air refueling, and munition support for missile warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO).

BRIEF HISTORY

The 319th Bombardment Wing was activated on 26 June 1942 as the 319th Bombardment Group (Medium) at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. The group trained with B-26s and moved, via England, to the Mediterranean theater in November 1942 to support Allied operations in that area. In November 1944, the unit converted to B-25 aircraft. In January 1945, the group returned to the U.S., was redesignated the 319th Bombardment Group (Light) on 3 February 1945, and was assigned the A-26 attack bomber. The group moved to Okinawa in April 1945 and began flying missions in July against targets in China and Japan. The group returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 18 December 1945. The unit was allotted to the Reserve and activated at Mitchell Field, New York, on 27 December 1946. Group personnel trained Reserve air crews in the A-26 bomber. After moving to Reading Municipal Airport, Pennsylvania, in June 1949, the group became a component of the 319th Bombardment Wing (Light). Both the wing and the group were inactivated on 2 September 1949. The wing and its components were activated in the Reserve on 10 October 1949 at Birmingham Municipal Airport, Alabama. The wing and the group performed Reserve training until ordered to active service on 10 March 1951 because of the Korean crisis. The units never left Birmingham, but the equipment and personnel assigned to the 319th were assigned to other USAF units. The group was inactivated on 22 March 1951, while the wing was inactivated on 28 March 1951. Both were activated in the Reserve on 18 May 1955 as the 319th Fighter-Bomber Wing at Memphis Municipal Airport, Tennessee. In addition to its normal Reserve role, the 319th maintained two F-84s on "runway alert" at Memphis Municipal Airport from July 1956 through August 1957. The 319th was inactivated on 16 November 1957. The 319th was redesignated and activated as the 319th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 15 November 1962 and was organized on 1 February 1963 at Grand Forks AFB, South Dakota, as the replacement for the 4133d Strategic Wing. From 1965 until 1974, the 319th sent KC-135A and B-52H crews and aircraft on temporary duty assignments to support combat operations in Southeast Asia. The Short Range Attack Missile (SRAM) was added to the wing's inventory in 1973. The 319th gained a new mission in 1980 when it became part of the Strategic Projection Force, the Air Force component of the Rapid Deployment Force. The 319th converted to B-52G aircraft modified with the improved Offensive Avionics System (OAS) and the Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) in 1983. The unit converted to the KC-135R aircraft in 1987 and the B-1B bomber in 1988.

320th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Mather Air Force Base, Sacramento, California
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The 320th Bombardment Wing (320th BMW) is tasked to develop and maintain operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The wing may be employed to support nuclear operations as required by the EWO against targets designated in the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) or to support contingency operations as directed by the Strategic Air Command (SAC) in pertinent operations orders.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 320th Bombardment Wing was activated as the 320th Bombardment Group, Medium, at MacDill Field, Florida, on 23 June 1942. The group trained with B-26 bombers and moved via England to the Mediterranean theater in late 1942 to support Allied operations in that area. The group moved to France in November 1944 and remained there until the conclusion of the war. During the war, the group flew the first B-26 night mission and flew two years of continuous combat operations—longer than any other B-26 equipped group. After V-E Day, the group moved to Germany and participated in the disarmament of German Luftwaffe units. The unit returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 4 December 1945. The group was allotted to the Reserve and activated on 9 July 1947 and inactivated on 27 June 1949. The group was consolidated with the 320th Bombardment Wing when it was activated on 1 December 1952 and replaced the 106th Bombardment Wing, Medium, at March AFB, California. The wing was equipped with B-29 bombers and KC-97 tankers to accomplish its mission of conducting global bombardment training and air refueling operations. In July 1953, the wing's B-29 bombers were replaced with the YRB-47 experimental bomber/reconnaissance aircraft. The wing retained its dual bombardment and reconnaissance mission until March 1954 when it converted to the B-47 bomber aircraft. On 15 September 1960, the wing was discontinued. On 1 February 1963, the 320th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, was organized at Mather AFB, California, taking control of the assets of the discontinued 4134th Strategic Wing. The wing was equipped with B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers. In February 1965, the wing deployed to the western Pacific and, on 18 June 1965, became the first SAC bombardment unit to fly combat strikes over Vietnam. During the Southeast Asian War, the wing provided aircraft, crews, and support personnel to other SAC units for combat operations. The wing currently consists of one B-52G squadron.

321st STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN
Grand Forks Air Force Base, Grand Forks, North Dakota
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 321st Strategic Missile Wing (321st SMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 321st SMW maintains its force of 150 Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) in strategic readiness.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 321st Strategic Missile Wing was activated as the 321st Bombardment Group, Medium, on 26 June 1942 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. The group trained with B-25s in preparation for oversea duty. In January 1943, the group moved to Mediterranean theater, where it remained for the next two and one-half years supporting Allied operations in that area. The group remained in Italy until it was inactivated on 12 September 1945. The unit was activated on 29 June 1947 at Mansfield, Ohio, and allotted to the Reserves until it was inactivated on 27 June 1949. On 15 December 1953, the unit was activated as the 321st Bombardment Wing, Medium, at Pinecastle (later, McCoy) AFB, Florida. The wing conducted global bombardment training and air refueling operations with B-47 and KC-97 aircraft. In August 1957, one of the wing's B-47s established a new flight record by flying nonstop from Andersen AFB, Guam, to Sidi Sliraane AB, Morocco (a distance of 11,450 miles) in 22.5 hours. The wing was inactivated on 25 October 1961. The wing was redesignated and activated as the 321st Strategic Missile Wing on 14 August 1964 at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota, but was not organized until 1 November 1964. From November 1964 to November 1966, the wing monitored Minuteman II ICBM facility construction. The first Minuteman II missile was assigned in August 1965 and the wing became operational with 150 Minuteman II missiles in November 1966, becoming the first wing to employ this missile. The wing completed its conversion to the Minuteman III ICBM in March 1973. The wing currently is assigned three operational squadrons and is responsible for 150 Minuteman III missiles deployed over a 7,500 square mile area.

340th AIR REFUELING WING, HEAVY
Altus Air Force Base, Altus, Oklahoma
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 340th Air Refueling Wing (340th AREFW) is to develop and maintain operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare as contained in the Emergency War Order (EWO). In accomplishing this mission, the wing supports Strategic Air Command's Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) and higher headquarters contingency plans. The 340th has an additional peacetime mission of air refueling aircraft from the Military Airlift Command, Tactical Air Command, SAC or any other forces as directed by the Department of Defense.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 340th Air Refueling Wing was activated on 20 August 1942 as the 340th Bombardment Group (Medium) at Columbia Army Air Base, South Carolina. The group's B-25 bombers first saw action in World War II in Tunisia. Throughout the war, the group supported allied efforts in Sicily and Italy. At the conclusion of the war, the group returned to South Carolina and was inactivated on 7 November 1946. Redesignated as the 340th Bombardment Group, Light, the 340th was a Reserve unit from 31 October 1947 until it was inactivated on 19 August 1949. On 20 October 1952, SAC reactivated and redesignated the unit as the 340th Bombardment Wing, Medium. Equipped with B-47 bombers, the wing was located at Sedalia (later, Whiteman) AFB, Missouri. The 340th was disbanded at Whiteman AFB, Missouri, in August 1963, and moved without personnel or equipment to Bergstrom AFB, Texas. It absorbed the resources and mission of the former 4130th Strategic Wing and was redesignated the 340th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 September 1963. The 340th was inactivated on 2 October 1966, but was activated as the 340th Bombardment Group, Medium, on 22 May 1968 at Carswell AFB, Texas. While assigned there, the group became the first SAC unit to receive the new FB-111A aircraft, which it flew until its inactivation on 31 December 1971. The 340th was redesignated the 340th Air Refueling Group, Heavy, on 14 June 1977, and activated on 1 July 1977, at Altus AFB, Oklahoma. The group was redesignated the 340th Air Refueling Wing in 1984. The 340th AREFW currently consists of two operational squadrons, each assigned KC-135R tankers.

341st STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN
Malmstrom Air Force Base, Great Falls, Montana
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 341st Strategic Missile Wing (341st SMW) is to maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare in support of the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 341st SMW maintains its 20 launch control facilities and 200 Minuteman launch facilities with their associated missiles in strategic readiness.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 341st Strategic Missile Wing was activated on 15 September 1942 as the 341st Bombardment Group (Medium) in Karachi, India. The group trained in B-25 aircraft prior to entering combat in late 1942, operating chiefly against enemy transportation in central Burma until early 1944. The group moved to China in January 1944 and engaged primarily in sea sweeps and attacks against Japanese inland shipping. The group flew its last combat mission in July 1945 and was inactivated on 2 November 1945 after returning to the U.S. The group was activated as a reserve unit at Westover Field, Massachusetts, from 27 December 1946 until 27 June 1949. The 341st Bombardment Wing, Medium, was formed from "scratch" at Abilene (later, Dyess) AFB, Texas, on 1 September 1955. Equipped with B-47 bomber and KC-97 tanker aircraft, the wing performed strategic bombardment and air refueling training operations until it was inactivated on 25 June 1961. On 1 July 1961, the wing became the 341st Strategic Missile Wing at Malmstrom AFB, Montana, becoming the USAF's first Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) wing. The wing is currently the only wing assigned both Minuteman II and Minuteman III missiles. The wing is assigned four operational missile squadrons: three squadrons assigned a total of 150 Minuteman II missiles and one assigned 50 Minuteman III missiles. The wing's 200 launch facilities and 20 launch control facilities cover 23,000 square miles in Montana making it SAC's largest Minuteman wing.

351st STRATEGIC MISSILE WING – MINUTEMAN
Whiteman Air Force Base, Knob Noster, Missouri
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 351st Strategic Missile Wing (351st SMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The 351st SMW maintains its force of 150 Minuteman II Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) in strategic readiness.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 351st Strategic Missile Wing was activated as the 351st Bombardment Group (Heavy) at Salt Lake City Army Air Field, Utah, on 1 October 1942. The group trained for duty overseas with B-17s before being moved to England in April 1943. The group served in combat from May 1943 to April 1945, operating primarily against strategic objectives in Germany but often supporting ground forces or attacking interdictory targets. Soon after V-E Day, the group returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 28 August 1945. The 351st was a Reserve unit from 9 April 1947, until inactivated on 27 June 1949. The 351st Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Minuteman) was activated on 9 August 1962 at Whiteman AFB, Missouri. The wing initially supervised missile training operations and coordinated the construction of Minuteman II missiles in 1967. The wing is currently assigned three operational missile squadrons and is responsible for 150 Minuteman II missiles dispersed throughout a 10,000 square mile missile complex.

376th STRATEGIC WING
Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
Fifteenth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 376th Strategic Wing (376th SW) is to develop and maintain operational capability to conduct strategic warfare in accordance with the Emergency War Order (EWO). The overall mission includes aerial refueling, reconnaissance, and reconnaissance support. It also maintains a constant contingency of alert aircraft. The wing plays a vital role in the preservation of a strong military posture, responsive to the needs of the United States' defense in the western Pacific.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 376th Strategic Wing was activated on 31 October 1942 in Palestine as the 376th Bombardment Group (Heavy). The group used its B-24 bomber aircraft for heavy bombardment of enemy strategic military targets in support of Allied operations. After the war, the group returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 10 November 1945. The group was activated on 1 June 1951 at Forbes AFB, Kansas, as the 376th Bombardment Wing, Medium, moving to Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, in October 1951. The wing trained in strategic bombardment with B-29 and later with B-47 aircraft. The wing's bombardment operations sometimes were overshadowed by electronic countermeasure operations, which became the wing's primary mission in 1953. The 376th also conducted EB-47 post attack command and control operations from 1962 to 1965 and air refueling from 1953 to 1964 with KC-97 and later KC-135 tanker aircraft. In 1957, the wing moved to Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, remaining there until the wing was inactivated on 15 March 1965. The wing was activated as the 376th Strategic Wing on 1 April 1970 at Kadena AB, Japan. During the 1970s, the wing's B-52 aircraft conducted combat operations in Southeast Asia while other wing aircraft conducted air refueling and electronic reconnaissance in the western Pacific. The wing currently has one permanently assigned operational air refueling squadron utilizing KC-135A and KC-135Q aircraft. The wing also has assigned responsibility for two task forces. The Giant Bear Task Force has refueling responsibility while the Rivet Joint Reconnaissance Task Force manages crews on temporary duty assignment to fly RC-135 reconnaissance missions•

379th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 379th Bombardment Wing (379th BMW) is to develop and maintain the operational capability to conduct strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO) as specifically outlined in the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP). The 379th BMW also maintains B-52G and KC-135A aircraft on continuous alert as an integral part of the Strategic Air Command's deterrent force.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 379th Bombardment Wing was activated on 3 November 1942 at Geiger Field, Washington, as the 379th Bombardment Group (Heavy). After training in B-17 operations, the group moved to England and flew its first combat mission on 29 May 1943. During its 23 months of combat, the group flew 330 combat missions and flew more sorties than any other Eighth Air Force unit. The group was deactivated on 25 July 1945. On 1 November 1955, the group was reactivated as the 379th Bombardment Wing, Medium, at Homestead AFB, Florida, where it trained for air refueling and strategic bombardment operations in KC-97 and B-47 aircraft. On 9 January 1961, the wing was redesignated the 379th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, and moved to Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan, without equipment. The wing was reequipped with KC-135 and B-52 aircraft and has performed air refueling operations since June 1961 and strategic bombardment training since May 1961. At that time, the wing became the. first unit in SAC to fly the B-52H aircraft. The wing supported combat operations in Southeast Asia with KC-135 aircraft and crews from 1965 to 1975 and with B-52 crews from 1970 to 1975. In 1982, the wing became operational with the Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). The wing currently consists of one squadron equipped with B-52G bomber aircraft and one squadron equipped with KC-135A tanker aircraft.

380th BOMBARDMENT WING, MEDIUM
Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Plattsburgh, New York
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 380th Bombardment Wing (380th BMW) is to develop and maintain capabilities to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). An alert force of FB-111A and KC-135A/Q aircraft plus ongoing training, planning and intelligence gathering, enable the 380th BMW to meet its mission.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 380th Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated at Davis-Monthan Field, Arizona, on 3 November 1942, although it was not manned until 27 November. The group underwent B-24 combat training at Biggs Field, Texas, then flew to Northern Australia to ensure Australia's safety against any threatened Japanese invasion. The group began combat operations in May 1943 by flying armed reconnaissance patrols. The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) in August 1943 and again in May 1944 for its combat performance. In August 1945, the 380th moved to Okinawa where it flew armed reconnaissance patrols and ferried released prisoners of war. By December 1945, the squadrons were reduced to paper status and group headquarters strength reduced until the group was inactivated on 20 February 1946. The 380th was redesignated the 380th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and activated in the Reserve at MacDill Field, Florida, on 16 June 1947. Two years later it was redesignated a Medium Bombardment Group and attached as a collary reserve unit to the 370th Bombardment Group at MacDill. The group was ordered to active duty on 1 May 1951, but was inactivated two weeks later. On 23 March 1953, it was established as the 380th Bombardment Wing, Medium, but was not activated until 11 July 1955 when it replaced the 4020th Air Base Squadron at Plattsburgh AFB, New York. The first permanently assigned B-47 arrived on 1 June 1956. The wing experienced many changes during the next 15 years: conducted overseas Reflex Action B-47 Alert from 1959 until 1965; service tested a Super Wing concept (over 70 B-47 bombers and over 40 KC-97 aircraft); operated EB-47 Post Attack Command Control aircraft; performed KC-97 Air Refueling until September 1964 when it transitioned to KC-135 tankers; controlled an Atlas F Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) squadron from September 1964 until April 1965; performed B-52 Bombardment Training from June 1966 until December 1970 and began FB-111 strategic bombardment training in July 1971. The 380th BMW currently consists of two FB-111A and two KC-135A/Q Stratotanker squadrons.

384th Bombardment Wing, Heavy
McConnell Air Force Base, Wichita, Kansas
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 384th Bombardment Wing, Heavy (384th BMW) is to develop and maintain operational capability to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). The mission of the 384th BMW encompasses the ability to generate, launch, recover, and reconstitute Strategic Air Command tactical aircraft and deploy designated personnel and associated support equipment.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 384th Bombardment Wing was activated in December 1942 at Gowen Field, Idaho, as the 384th Bombardment Group, Heavy. The unit moved to Wendover Field, Utah, where it trained for combat with the B-17 aircraft. In mid-1943, the group moved to England and commenced combat missions against targets in the European Theater. In mid-1945, the group relocated in France where it flew American soldiers to Casablanca for return to the U.S., and flew French repatriots from Africa to France on the return trip. In late 1945, the unit moved allied troops to Germany. The group was inactivated in France in February 1946 but was reactivated as a Reserve unit in Nashville, Tennessee, from July 1947 to June 1949. On 1 August 1955, the unit was activated as the 384th Bombardment Wing, Medium, at Little Rock AFB, Arkansas. The wing flew B-47 bombers and KC-97 tankers and later converted to KC-135 tankers. The wing was inactivated on 1 September 1964, but was later redesignated the 384th Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, and activated at McConnell AFB, Kansas, on 1 December 1972. The wing deployed KC-135 tankers and crews on a worldwide basis, including air refueling support for the evacuation of South Vietnamese and Americans from Vietnam in 1975. In 1985, the 384th became the first all KC-135R unit in the Air Force. On 1 July 1987, the 384th Air Refueling Wing was redesignated as the 384th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, and the wing completed its conversion to the B—1B bomber in 1988.

410th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
K. I. Sawyer Air Force, Gwinn, Michigan
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 410th Bombardment Wing (410th BMW) is to maintain an operational capability for strategic warfare meeting the standards set within the Emergency War Order (EWO). The wing must be able to conduct worldwide long-range bombardment and aerial refueling operations by maintaining assigned units in a state of readiness to permit immediate operations as outlined in current emergency plans and related operations orders.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 410th Bombardment Wing was activated on 1 July 1943 at Will Rogers Field, Oklahoma, as the 410th Bombardment Group, Light. The unit trained in the A-20 aircraft and moved to England, flying its first combat mission in May 1944 in support of allied operations in Europe. In the spring of 1945, the wing converted to A-26 aircraft but the war ended before the group was ready to fly the aircraft in combat. The group returned to the U.S. and was inactivated on 7 November 1945. The 410th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, was activated and assigned to SAC on 1 February 1963, at K.I. Sawyer AFB, Michigan, assuming the history and battle honors of the 410th Bombardment Group and absorbing the personnel and resources of the 4042d Strategic Wing. The primary mission of the 410th was to conduct strategic bombardment and air refueling training operations on a global scale to meet SAC commitments with its assigned B-52 bomber and KC-135 tanker aircraft. The wing supported combat operations in Southeast Asia with KC-135 aircraft and crews from 1964 to 1975 and with B-52 crews from 1968 to 1975. The 410th was the first H model wing in SAC to achieve operational capability with the Short Range Attack Missile (SRAM) in January 1973. The wing currently operates with one B—52H bomber squadron and two KC—135A tanker squadrons.

416th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, New York
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

The mission of the 416th Bombardment Wing (416th BMW) is to maintain an operational capability for strategic warfare meeting the standards set within the Emergency War Order. The wing must be able to conduct worldwide long-range bombardment and aerial refueling operations by maintaining assigned units in a state of readiness to permit immediate operations as outlined in current emergency plans and related operations orders.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 416th Bombardment Wing was activated on 5 February 1943 at Will Rogers Field, Oklahoma, as the 416th Bombardment Group, Light. The group trained in the A-20 aircraft and moved to England, flying its first combat mission in March 1944 in support of allied operations in Europe. In November 1944, the group converted to A-26 aircraft which flew until the conclusion of the war. Following the surrender of Germany, the 416th returned to the U.S. and was inactivated in October 1945. The 416th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, was activated on 15 November 1962, organized at Griffiss AFB, New York, on 1 February 1963, and absorbed the personnel and resources of the 4039th Strategic Wing. The wing conducted strategic bombardment and air refueling training operations on a global scale to meet SAC commitment with its assigned B-52 bomber and KC-135 tanker aircraft. The wing supported SAC operations in the Far East and Southeast Asia with tankers and crews from 1964 to 1965 and with B-52 crews from 1968 to 1975. In 1982, the wing became the first USAF operational unit configured with the Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). The wing currently operates with one squadron each of B-52G bomber and KC-135A tanker aircraft.

509th BOMBARDMENT WING, HEAVY
Pease Air Force Base, Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Eighth Air Force

MISSION

To develop and maintain capabilities to permit the conduct of strategic warfare according to the Emergency War Order (EWO). An alert force of FB-111As and KC-135As combined with ongoing training, planning and intelligence gathering enables the 509th Bombardment Wing (509th BMW) to meet its mission.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 509th Bombardment Wing was constituted as the 509th Composite Group on 9 December 1944 and activated eight days later at Wendover Army Field, Utah. This unit was formed to deliver the nation's most secret weapon at the time, the atomic bomb. On 6 August 1945, a 509th B-29 aircraft, the "Enola Gay," piloted by Group Commander Colonel Paul W. Tibbetts, Jr., dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later another B-29, "Bocks Car," piloted by Major Charles W. Sweeney, dropped the second atomic bomb on Nagasaki. These two bombs quickly brought an end to the war. With their mission complete, the 509th returned to the U.S. in November 1945 and moved to Roswell Air Field (later renamed Walker AFB), New Mexico, where 509th personnel flew B-29 bombers and KB-29 tankers. On 12 June 1946, it was redesignated the 509th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, but became a component of the 509th Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, when it was activated on 3 November 1947. The group was redesignated as the 509th Bombardment Group, Medium, on 2 July 1948. On 25 January 1951, the group was reduced to record status until it was inactivated on 16 June 1952. The 509th Bombardment Wing was subsequently awarded, temporarily, the history and honors of the 509th Bombardment Group. The wing converted to KC-97 tankers in 1954 and B-47 bombers in 1955 and moved to Pease AFB, New Hampshire, in 1958. The 509th phased down for inactivation in late 1965, but was converted to a B-52 bomber/KC-135 tanker wing and was redesignated the 509th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 2 April 1966. The wing supported SAC combat and contingency operations in Southeast Asia with its B-52 and KC-135 aircraft. In 1968 and 1969, the wing flew its entire B-52 force, most of its tanker fleet and over 1,000 personnel to Andersen AFB, Guam, for six-month tours to provide heavy air support for friendly forces operating in Southeast Asia. When the wing returned to Pease in September 1969, plans were already under way to make the 509th the first SAC operational unit to receive the FB-111A bomber. The last B-52 bomber left Pease on 19 November 1969. The wing was officially redesignated the 509th Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 1 December 1969 and received its first FB-111A in 1970. The 509th received the Short Range Attack Missile (SRAM) in May 1972, giving the FB-111 a dual strike capability. On 2 April 1974, a 509th bomber crew performed the first successful live SRAM launch from an FB-111. The 509th was the first unit to receive the FB-111 bombers modified under the avionics modernization program (AMP), a $3.6 million per aircraft modification to increase avionics systems reliability. The wing currently has two FB-111A and one KC-135A squadrons assigned.

544th Strategic Intelligence Wing
Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Nebraska
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

To process, produce, and disseminate all-source intelligence information to support Strategic Air Command, the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff, national agencies, and other unified and specified commands .

BRIEF HISTORY

The 544th Strategic Intelligence Wing was initially activated as the 544th Reconnaissance Technical Squadron on 16 November 1950 at Boiling Air Force Base. The initial nucleus of experienced personnel came from the discontinued 4203d Photographic Technical Squadron. The 544th moved to Offutt AFB in April 1952, although a small unit (Detachment 1) continued operation at Boiling AFB to research target materials and act as a liaison with the intelligence community in the Washington, DC area. The 544th mission was continually expanded throughout the 1950s. On 11 July 1958, the unit was redesignated the 544th Reconnaissance Technical Group. During the 1960s, the group's mission, responsibilities and organization continued to grow. The 544th became most visible to the rest of the world during the Cuban Missile Crisis. It was the 544th photo interpreters who first alerted the nation to the deployment of offensive missiles into Cuba. The 544th also supported the war effort in Southeast Asia. In 1979 the 544th was designated as a major command special activity and, on 15 October 1979, was redesignated the 544th Strategic Intelligence Wing. On 5 February 1987, the 544th was presented its 10th Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (AFOUA). With this award, the wing claimed the distinction of having garnered the AFOUA more times than any other wing in SAC.

DIRECT REPORTING UNITS

1st COMBAT EVALUATION GROUP
Barksdale Air Force Base, Bossier City, Louisiana
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

To provide command standardization/evaluation and bomb scoring programs and such contingency warfare support as may be assigned.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 1st Combat Evaluation Group (1CEVG) was activated on 1 August 1961 at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana. The 1CEVG brought under one commander the functions of two former Strategic Air Command (SAC) units, the 3908th Strategic Standardization Group and the 1st Radar Bomb Scoring Group. Since its inception, the group's mission has been to provide command level standardization/evaluation of SAC aircrews, radar scoring of simulated bombing activity by SAC aircraft and any contingency warfare support required by Headquarters Strategic Air Command and Headquarters United States Air Force. In 1986, the 1CEVG acquired an additional mission to help address the command's need to emphasize tactical employment of SAC aircraft. The group continues to meet the changing needs of SAC aircrews through standardization/evaluation, radar bomb scoring, and now, tactics development/employment. The 1CEVG conducts worldwide operations using 13 detachments, three mobile duty locations, and 900 officers, airmen and civilians.

3901st STRATEGIC MISSILE EVALUATION SQUADRON
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Lompoc, California
Strategic Air Command

MISSION

To develop command Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) standardization and evaluation programs, and periodically evaluate and report on the status of these and associated programs in operational missile units. Also to provide technical expertise and support to various Headquarters Strategic Air Command (SAC) agencies as outlined in SACR 23-5.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 3901st Strategic Standardization Squadron (Missiles) was activated on 1 July 1961 at Vandenberg AFB, California, two and one-half years after the first missile launch from Vandenberg. The new squadron was under the operational control of the Headquarters SAC Director of Operations. On 15 September 1961, it was redesignated the 3901st Strategic Missile Evaluation Squadron (3901st SMES). Over the years, the squadron's original mission to conduct standardization evaluations expanded to include representing the command in all missile-related design, development and testing negotiations with civilian contractors and command agencies, and validating technical orders for use in the field. Squadron personnel also work closely with the 4315th Combat Crew Training Squadron (4315th CCTS) at Vandenberg to revise and update combat crew job performance task lists, which form the basis for all missile crew training and evaluations. Squadron personnel also conduct the initial qualification check of 4315th students upon completion of the 4315th combat crew training course. The 3901st staff conduct Quality Assurance Management and ICBM Instructor Techniques courses for the command's missile force. After completion of these courses, the individuals return to their units as qualified Maintenance Quality Assurance personnel and are responsible for the training standards and maintenance of the SAC missile fleet. The importance and successful accomplishments of this organization were again recognized when the 3901st SMES was selected to receive its seventh Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. The 3901st plays a vital role in the nation's defense by ensuring that combat missile crews and missile support personnel are fully trained and capable of keeping the SAC missile force on alert.

4315th COMBAT CREW TRAINING SQUADRON
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Lompoc, California
1st Strategic Aerospace Division

MISSION

To conduct initial training for Strategic Air Command (SAC) missile combat crews and training courses for SAC missile operations staff officers and Department of Defense (DOD) personnel.

BRIEF HISTORY

The 4315th Combat Crew Training Squadron was designated and organized as the 4315th Student Squadron at Cooke AFB, California (later to be Vandenberg AFB), on 1 May 1958 and assigned to the 392d Air Base Group. Six months later, it was reassigned to the 704th Strategic Missile Wing. During the next five years, it was reassigned three times: 1st Missile Division on 1 July 1959, 392d Strategic Missile Wing on 18 October 1961, and 1st Strategic Aerospace Division on 20 December 1961. On 14 May 1963, the unit was redesignated the 4315th Combat Crew Training Squadron. The 4315th was reassigned to Fifteenth Air Force on 1 April 1970 before coming back to stay with 1st Strategic Aerospace Division on 14 January 1975. The 4315th is responsible for implementing the SAC Missile Combat Crew Training Program. All missile crew personnel have at one time or another been trained in this squadron.